kanji water

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image of Kanji Water Preparation Method and Benefits

Kanji Water Preparation Method and Benefits

May 24, 2017 · How to Make Kanji Water (Brown Rice Water) Take water in a pan and add brown rice in it. Boil the water with rice until the rice become soft and swollen. Now, filter the water to separate the rice. Add salt, fresh ginger page and ground cumin in the rice water. Now, Kanji water is ready to consume. Medicinal PropertiesKanji Water is prepared from brown rice. It is used as supportive therapy in the management of dehydration, diarrhea, cholera, gastroenteritis, leucorrhea..
From: www.ayurtimes.com

Kanji Water is prepared from brown rice. It is light to digest. It is used as supportive therapy in the management of dehydration, diarrhea, cholera and gastroenteritis. Traditionally, it is also used to treat leucorrhea.

In ayurveda, Kanji is also used to detoxify and purify some poisonous substances. For example, rosary peas (Abrus Precatorius) are boiled for 3 to 6 hours in Kanji to reduce its toxic effects.

Ingredients & Preparation Method How to Make Kanji Water (Brown Rice Water)

Now, Kanji water is ready to consume.

Medicinal Properties

Kanji Water has following medicinal properties:

Ayurvedic Properties Therapeutic Indications Kanji Water Benefits

Kanji Water is the best alternative treatment for dehydration and loose stools. It helps to keep you hydrated and energetic. It has a cooling action. In summers, it helps you to reduce the effects of excess heat and prevents sunburns.

Diarrhea

Kanji Water binds the stool due to its astringent action and relieves diarrhea. It also restores the water in the body and thus prevents dehydration.

Leucorrhea

Kanji Water is prepared from brown rice. It is known for its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory actions. It helps to reduce watery and white mucous discharge in women.

Mastitis

Oryza sativa (rice) has ant-mastitis property. It reduces inflammation and treats infection occurring in the breasts causing mastitis. (1)

However, Kanji Water has a mild action to relieve mastitis, but it can be used as supportive therapy along with other ayurvedic medicines.


image of Do you know the Kanji for Water? Let's Learn the Water ...

Do you know the Kanji for Water? Let's Learn the Water ...

It's the End of Kanji for Water Week! Did you notice most of our kanji this week used the water radical kanji for water (水, 氵, 氺)? 16 of the 21, in fact!.
From: blog.nihongomaster.com

It’s the End of Kanji for Water Week!

Did you notice most of our kanji this week used the water radical kanji for water (水, 氵, 氺)? 16 of the 21, in fact! Many times, kanji won’t look like their exact meaning but they will tell a story using the radicals and parts that make them up. This is why it is very important to learn the radicals of each kanji. It can be very helpful!

OK, on to our 21 kanji of the week! For a fun game, try to tell yourself the meaning of each kanji and a word it is used on before clicking the link to see the answer.

Week 17: From “Esquire” to “China” (aka “Water Week!) Did you try to quiz yourself? How many did you get right?

If you’re struggling with learning each and every day, try adding the kanji to your drills in Nihongo Master. With customized drills, your kanji will keep popping back up every so often to make sure you haven’t forgotten what you already learned!

Another great trick is to use the printable practice sheets! Writing is proven to help memory, and you can learn stroke order at the same today! Hooray!

Week 17: Joyo Kanji Challenge Study List Week 17: Joyo Kanji Challenge Printable Writing Sheet

Still having trouble remembering all the kanji each week? Subscribe to the Kanji Challenge email where you will receive FREE PRINTABLE FLASHCARDS!! These aren’t available anywhere else on the site, so make sure you join the list to get access.


image of 85. The

85. The "Water" Radical: 水, 氵, and 氺 | Joy o' Kanji

You can write that in kanji as 三水 (three + water), reflecting the fact that 氵has three strokes. This name differentiates 氵 from the two-stroke 冫, the "ice" radical known as にすい and represented in kanji as 二水 (two + water) .Free essay on the 'water' radical, 水, and its variants: their positions in a character, names, and stroke counts, plus the handwritten form of 'sanzui'.
From: www.joyokanji.com

Did you know that there are three variations on the "water" radical? 

The "Water" Radical with the 水 Shape

For starters, there's 水, the kanji that means "water." When this shape serves as a radical, it's known as みず or すい. That's true in the following characters:

氷 (378: ice) 
求 (455: to demand)
永 (615: eternity)

Denshi Jisho says 378 contains the "dot" radical 丶, but that appears to be an error. Many other sources recognize the "water" radical in 氷.

The "Water" Radical as 氵

The most common version of the "water" radical is氵, which appears (often on the left side) in kanji such as the following:

活 (244: lively)
洋 (404: ocean, Western style)
泣 (838: to cry)

Whenever 氵 pops up in a character, it's almost certain to be the radical. Two notable exceptions:

落 (408: to come down)
染 (917: dye)

The radicals here are 艹 ("grass") and 木 ("tree") respectively.

The "Water" Radical as 氺

When water pools at the bottom of a character, the shape of the radical becomes 氺 and the name becomes したみず. This shape functions as the radical in the following kanji:

求 (455: to seek)
泰 (1545: tranquil)

It's a component in others:

救 (456: to help)
漆 (1334: lacquer)
爆 (1702: bomb)

The radicals here are 攴 ("strike") in 456 and 火 ("fire") in 1702. Meanwhile in 1334, the radical is 氵. In other words, there are two types of water in one character! Is lacquer that watery? 

Stroke Counts of the Various "Water" Radical Shapes

You may be wondering about the relationship between 水 and its variants 氵and 氺. (Radical Terms explains the term "variant.") They have different stroke counts—four for 水, three for 氵, and five for 氺. If you consult the chart of historical radicals at the front of Nelson's dictionary, you'll need to scan the list of four-stroke kanji to find the "parent" radical 水 in slot 85, immediately followed by listings for the two variants.

Names of the Various "Water" Radicals

The nomenclature of 氵 presents another issue. Although most left-side radicals have -へん in their names, 氵is called さんずい. You can write that in kanji as 三水 (three + water), reflecting the fact that 氵has three strokes. This name differentiates 氵 from the two-stroke 冫, the "ice" radical known as にすい and represented in kanji as 二水 (two + water). It's rare to write these names as 三水 or 二水; people use hiragana instead. But 三水 and 二水 make the nomenclature much clearer, wouldn't you say?

The Handwritten Form of 氵

Incidentally, the handwritten form of 氵 differs markedly from many typeset versions. When drawn by hand, this radical consists of three separate lines, as in the following kanji (1094: to perspire):

As you can see, the water here disconnects into three little beads. Water disconnects in a different way in this non-Joyo character:

淼 (ビョウ: vast (expanse of water))

Did you ever imagine that water could stack in a pyramid formation?!


image of Kanji Recipe (Healthy Probiotic Drink) » Dassana's Veg …

Kanji Recipe (Healthy Probiotic Drink) » Dassana's Veg …

Kanji recipe is traditional North Indian, Punjabi drink made with carrots, spices, water. Kanji is a healthy and fermented probiotic drink..
From: www.vegrecipesofindia.com

Learn to make Kanji recipe – a traditional North Indian fermented drink. This healthy probiotic drink is traditionally made with black carrots. But with all the health benefits, my easy recipe is made with juicy red carrots and beets.

What is Kanji

Kanji is a probiotic drink made in the Northern Indian states. You can compare it with Kombucha, but the process of making kanji is entirely different than Kombucha.

Being a probiotic drink it is extremely good for the gut and improves digestion. Traditionally Kanji recipe is made with black carrots and this drink has a dark purple color. I do not get black carrots and I make this healthy drink with red carrots.

Kanji is spiced with ground mustard seeds, red chilli powder and black salt or salt. The carrots, spices, seasonings are mixed with some boiled cooled water and kept to ferment for a few days.

The entire drink with its ingredients is filled in a glass or ceramic jar. These jars are kept in the sunlight and the drink is allowed to ferment for 2 to 3 to 4 days.

It depends on how the sun is behaving in your region. So the drink can be kept for 4 to 5 days if the sunlight is not enough. If it is hot or very hot, then 1 to 2 to 3 days are enough for the drink to get naturally fermented.

The mustard in the kanji drink keeps the body warm during the cold winters of North India. The fermentation process changes the flavors of the drink and makes it probiotic. The taste is mild sweet and sour with that unique aroma of a fermented drink.

Kanji is served as an appetizer drink. It has a sour, spicy and pungent taste. This taste is an acquired one – either you will like or won’t like it, just like Kombucha.

About This Recipe

With all of you, I share my family recipe to make this healthy drink. I have learnt this method of making Kanji from my mother-in-law.

She makes this drink every year with black carrots, while I use a mix of carrots and beets to get that dark reddish-purple color – as black carrots are difficult to get where I live.

You could also make a few variations to your kanji recipe by including some turnips or peeled watermelon rinds.

While I do make kombucha almost all year around, I make kanji only during the winters. In the Indian winters, I get access to fresh tender juicy red carrots, which is not the case through out the whole year.

The carrots and beets get pickled during the process of fermentation. They have a lovely fermented, pickled flavor and taste. So can be served as a side condiment with any Indian main course or added to salads, wraps, burgers.

I also prepare urad dal vada (black gram fritters) to soak in the kanji. This is a variation of the popular Kanji Vada that I make.

The method of making the vada for Dahi Vada is the same as that for Kanji vada. I have given details of the vada recipe in the notes section of the recipe card below, if you would like to make them.

The soft vada soaked in the sour kanji drink tastes so good. If you like dahi vada, probably you will kanji vada as well.

Step-by-Step Guide

Step-by-Step Kanji Recipe Prep The Ingredients

1: Rinse, peel and chop the carrot into batons or sticks with 1.5 to 2 inches length as shown in the photo below. Peel and chop the beets into 1.5 to 2 inches wedges or sticks.

Note that you can use orange carrots, if you do not have red carrots. If you are not a fan or beets, skip them and swap with 1 more medium-sized carrot.

2: In a dry grinder, grind the 2 tablespoons yellow mustard to a fine powder. If including black or brown mustard, use 1 tablespoon.

Mix the Kanji Ingredients

3: Boil water first. Let it cool at room temperature. In clean and dry ceramic or glass jar with a wide mouth, add the carrots, beets, ground yellow mustard powder, black salt or regular salt and red chili powder.

Pour this boiled cooled water in the jars. If you prefer, you can filter the water using a fine mesh strainer while pouring it in the jar.

4: Stir this mixture well with a clean dry spoon.

Ferment

5: Cover loosely with a lid or secure and tie a muslin/cheese cloth on the mouth of the jars or bottles. Keep the jars or bottles in sunlight.

Allow to ferment for 2 to 3 days until the drink becomes sour. Take care not to over ferment the drink.

Stir the mixture every next day with a clean wooden spoon before placing in the sun. Alternatively shake the jar instead of mixing with the spoon.

Serving & Storage Suggestions

6: When the drink starts tasting sour, it means the carrot kanji is ready. Keep the kanji drink in the refrigerator or serve straightway.

You could add a few ice cubes while serving. I like to have cold kanji, so I refrigerate it for a few hours. Kanji keeps well in the fridge for 4 to 5 days.

Drink the kanji before meals or anytime during the day. Serve the fermented carrot and beets sticks as a pickle with any Indian main course.

The sour-tangy carrots and beets can be included in a Salads or as toppings to your wraps, burgers or sandwiches.

Expert Tips

Please be sure to rate the recipe in the recipe card below if you have made it. For more vegetarian inspirations, Sign Up for my emails or follow me on Instagram, Youtube, Facebook, Pinterest or Twitter.

This kanji recipe post from the blog archives (March 2013) has been republished and updated on 26 May 2021.


image of 水 - Wiktionary

水 - Wiktionary

Nov 25, 2021 · A user has added this entry to requests for verification (); If it cannot be verified that this term meets our attestation criteria, it will be deleted.Feel free to edit this entry as normal, but do not remove {{}} until the request has been resolved..
From: en.wiktionary.org

See also: 𣱱, 氺, 氷, 永 and 氵

Translingual[edit] Alternative forms[edit] Han character[edit]

水 (radical 85, 水+0, 4 strokes, cangjie input 水 (E), four-corner 12230, composition ⿰𰛄⿺㇏丿(GJKV) or ⿰㇇𰛅(GJKV) or ⿰𰛄⿱丿㇏(HT))

Derived characters[edit] References[edit] Further reading[edit] Central Bai[edit] Noun[edit]

水 (xuix)

Chinese[edit] Glyph origin[edit]

Pictogram (象形) – compare 川 (chuan).

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *lwi(j) (“flow; stream”) (Benedict, 1974; Coblin, 1986; Handel, 1998; Schuessler, 2007; STEDT). Cognate with Mizo lui (“stream; brook; river”), Tedim Chin [script needed] (luːi³, “stream; river”), Jingpho lawi (“to flow (as water)”).

Old Chinese 水 (OC lhuiʔ) (minimally reconstructed) is Sino-Tibetan root's endoactive derivation with suffix *-ʔ, meaning "that which is flowing"; its voiceless initial suggests the presence of a nominalizing prefix *k- or *s-. Another derivative from the Sino-Tibetan root is possibly 泫 (OC winʔ, “to flow”) (minimally reconstructed).

Compare also areal etymon Proto-Mon-Khmer *lujʔ ~ luuj() ~ luəj() ~ ləəj() (“to wade; to swim”).

Alternatively, Gong (1995) reconstructs Old Chinese *hljədx and compares it to Tibetan ཆུ (chu, “water”), which STEDT derives from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *tsju (“water; liquid; bodily fluid”). Baxter and Sagart (2014), employing evidence from Proto-Min, reconstructs Old Chinese *s.turʔ and compares it to Proto-Sino-Tibetan *twəj (“to flow; to suppurate”), which is likely related to *m-t(w)əj-n ~ m-ti-s (“water; fluid; to soak; to be wet”) (STEDT). Like Gong (1995), Sagart (2017) compares it to Tibetan ཆུ (chu), but he also compares it to Bodo (India) दै (dwi), Mizo tui, Proto-Karen *thejᴬ, all of which STEDT derives from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *m-t(w)əj-n ~ m-ti-s. Handel deems derivations from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *tsju or *m-t(w)əj-n ~ m-ti-s unlikely because of phonological issues (STEDT).

Pronunciation[edit] Definitions[edit] Synonyms[edit] Compounds[edit] Descendants[edit] Etymology 2[edit] References[edit] Japanese[edit] Kanji[edit]

(grade 1 “Kyoiku” kanji)

Readings[edit] Compounds[edit] Etymology 1[edit]

⟨mi1du⟩ → */mʲidu/ → /mid͡zu/ → /mizu/

From Old Japanese, from Proto-Japonic *mentu. Cognate with Proto-Ryukyuan *mezu.

Possibly cognate with 瑞 (mizu, “freshness, youth”).

Possible cognate with Proto-Tungusic *mu, Jurchen 木克 (mu-ke /muke/), Manchu ᠮᡠᡴᡝ (muke), Goguryeo 買 (*me, “river; water”), Mongolian мөрөн (moron, “river”), Korean 물 (mul, “water”).

Pronunciation[edit] Noun[edit]

水(みず) • (mizu) ←みづ ?

Usage notes[edit]

Note that, while mizu is the most general Japanese term for “water”, it does refer specifically to “water that is not hot”. Meanwhile, the word 湯 (yu) refers specifically to “hot water”. Consider 水風呂 (mizu-buro, “cold-water bath”), contrasting with 風呂 (furo, “bath”, implying hot water).

Derived terms[edit] Idioms[edit] Proverbs[edit] Prefix[edit]

水(みず) • (mizu-) ←みづ ?

Derived terms[edit] Proper noun[edit]

水(みず) • (Mizu) ←みづ ?

Etymology 2[edit]

⟨mi1⟩ → */mʲi/ → /mi/

From Old Japanese.

Typically found in compounds.[2]

Affix[edit]

水(み) • (mi) 

Derived terms[edit] Etymology 3[edit]

/ɕuwi/ → */suwi/ → /sui/

From Middle Chinese 水 (MC ɕˠiuɪX).

Compare modern Mandarin 水 (shui), modern Hakka 水 (sui).

Pronunciation[edit] Noun[edit]

水(すい) • (sui) 

Affix[edit]

水(すい) • (sui) 

Derived terms[edit] Proper noun[edit]

水(すい) • (Sui) 

Etymology 4[edit]

⟨mopi1⟩ → */mopʲi/ → /moɸi/ → /mowi/ → /moi/

From Old Japanese. Via metonymy from the word 椀, 盌 (moi, “bowl”), from the meaning of “that which goes in the 椀, 盌 (moi, “bowl”)”.[1][2]

Pronunciation[edit] Noun[edit]

水(もい) • (moi) ←もひ ?

Derived terms[edit] See also[edit] References[edit] Korean[edit] Etymology[edit]

From Middle Chinese 水 (MC ɕˠiuɪX).

Pronunciation[edit] Hanja[edit]

Wikisource

水 (eumhun 물 수 (mul su))

Compounds[edit] References[edit] Lama Bai[edit] Noun[edit]

水 (ɕy³³)

Miyako[edit] Kanji[edit] Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Ryukyuan *mezu.

Pronunciation[edit] Noun[edit]

水 (hiragana みず, romaji mizu, mikɯ)

References[edit] Northern Amami-Oshima[edit] Kanji[edit] Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Ryukyuan *mezu.

Noun[edit]

水 (hiragana むぃずぃ, romaji mizi)

Oki-No-Erabu[edit] Kanji[edit] Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Ryukyuan *mezu.

Noun[edit]

水 (hiragana みじ, romaji miji)

References[edit] Okinawan[edit] Kanji[edit]

(grade 1 “Kyoiku” kanji)

Readings[edit] Compounds[edit] Etymology[edit]

From earlier 水 (midu → midzu → mizu), attested in 1711 in the 混効験集 (Konkokenshu), itself from Proto-Ryukyuan *mezu.

The word underwent a pronunciation change due to the shifting of /u/ to /i/ after alveolar consonants.

Cognate with Japanese 水 (mizu), Old Japanese 水 (mi1du).

Pronunciation[edit] Noun[edit]

水 (hiragana みじ, romaji miji)

Derived terms[edit] References[edit] Southern Amami-Oshima[edit] Kanji[edit] Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Ryukyuan *mezu.

Noun[edit]

水 (hiragana むぃでぃ, romaji midi)

Southern Bai[edit] Noun[edit]

水 (ɕy³³)

Vietnamese[edit] Han character[edit]

水: Han Viet readings: thuy/thuy (式(thuc)軌(quy)切(thiet))[1][2][3][4][5]
水: Nom readings: thuy/thuy[1][2][4][6], nuoc[2]

Compounds[edit] References[edit] Yonaguni[edit] Kanji[edit] Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Ryukyuan *mezu.

Possibly also related to Korean 물 (mul), Middle Korean 밀 (mil, “water”).

Pronunciation[edit] Noun[edit]

水 (hiragana みん, romaji min, hiragana みーん, romaji min)

References[edit] Yoron[edit] Kanji[edit] Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Ryukyuan *mezu.

Possibly also related to Korean 물 (mul), Middle Korean 밀 (mil, “water”).

Noun[edit]

水 (hiragana みじ, romaji miji)

References[edit]


Kanji Water – Ayurvedic Detox - Jiva Satva

To make Kanji water: 14 cups water 1 cup brown rice 3 or more pinches of salt, ginger powder, ground cumin and tumeric. 1. In a large pot, bring water and rice to a boil. Allow to boil for 1 hour until the rice becomes swollen and boken. 2. Stir and strain. Leaving in small pieces of rice. 3. Add pinches of salt, ginger powder, ground cumin and tumeric. 4.According to Ayurveda, fasting is an effective way to kindle the digestive fire (Agni), eliminate  toxins (Ama) from the body and mind, and improve energy. It also makes the body light, improves mental clarity and preserves overall health. Ayurveda favors regular, short-term fasting over infrequent, long-term fasting. This could be....
From: jivasattva.com

Kanji Water – Ayurvedic Detox

According to Ayurveda, fasting is an effective way to kindle the digestive fire (Agni), eliminate  toxins (Ama) from the body and mind, and improve energy. It also makes the body light, improves mental clarity and preserves overall health. Ayurveda favors regular, short-term fasting over infrequent, long-term fasting. This could be fasting on the same day each week or setting 2-3 days aside each month. According to Ayurveda, abstaining from food or water for extended periods of time depletes bodily tissues, leading to doshic imbalance.

It is best to choose a fasting period in which you will be able to follow  a peaceful, non-stressful routine. Ayurveda recommends to fast on Kanji water. You can drink more than 2 liters a day. Kanji delivers instant nutrition to the body. It provides carbohydrates, giving the body energy, and helps build more strength in the body in general. It is an excellent source of energy whenever the body is dehydrated or depleted from an illness. Kanji balances VATA, because it is warm, it relaxes PITTA due to its liquid and watery texture, and it balances KAPHA because it produces perspiration which releases toxins through the skin. It balances all 3 Doshas and brings the digestive fire (Agni) into balance.

To make Kanji water:

14 cups water
1 cup brown rice
3 or more pinches of salt, ginger powder, ground cumin and tumeric

1. In a large pot, bring water and rice to a boil. Allow to boil for 1 hour until the rice becomes swollen and boken.
2. Stir and strain. Leaving in small pieces of rice.
3. Add pinches of salt, ginger powder, ground cumin and tumeric.
4. Pour into a thermos and drink 1-2 liters throughout the day.


image of Kanji for Water in Japanese - Learn Japanese - Nihongo ...

Kanji for Water in Japanese - Learn Japanese - Nihongo ...

Water in Japanese is みず (mizu). The kanji is 水. Learn kanji compounds with 水 and other kanji with the "water" radical..
From: nihongoflashcards.com

Water in Japanese is みず (mizu). The kanji is 水. Learn kanji compounds with 水 and other kanji with the “water” radical.

Listen to the pronunciations and learn the stroke order in the video.

Nihongo Flashcards Kanji Practice Notebook

Practice writing kanji with this traditional 原稿用紙 (genkoyoshi; Japanese composition paper) notebook. Each square (called マス masu) has a quadrant guide for positioning and balance. You can start off with some Japanese food by copying the kanji on the cover.

Kanji Practice Notebook For Writing Japanese Characters Japanese Food 7×10 100 Pages

If you like our content and if you’d like to support us, you can buy us an onigiri via Buy Me a Coffee. Your 応援 (おうえん) support will mean the world to us!

Related Flashcards and Posts


image of Kanji (Indian Probiotic Drink) | My Heart Beets

Kanji (Indian Probiotic Drink) | My Heart Beets

Sep 16, 2014 · Kanji is a salty and sour Indian probiotic drink slightly similar to Beet Kvass. It’s an acquired taste that true ferment enthusiasts will appreciate. This drink is traditionally used to help aid digestion (so drink in moderation).Kanji is a salty and sour Indian probiotic drink slightly similar to Beet Kvass. It’s an acquired taste that true ferment enthusiasts will appreciate. This drink is traditionally used to help aid digestion (so drink in moderation)..
From: myheartbeets.com

In India, people have traditionally consumed a good amount of fermented foods.

Growing up, my family would make fermented drinks, pickles, achar, even meat. We never used the word “fermented” to describe these things, but that’s what they were. During the fall and winter seasons, my mom would make Kanji, a salty and sour probiotic drink that grew on me as I grew older.

Kanji is a traditional fermented Punjabi drink, only slightly similar to Beet Kvass.

I like to call it “Indian Kombucha.” It’s certainly an acquired taste, but I think true ferment enthusiasts will appreciate the unique flavor. This drink is traditionally used to help aid digestion (and it works, so drink in moderation).

Kanji and Thandai (a delicious creamy beverage) are often the drinks of choice during Holi, an Indian festival of colors.

My mom tells me that in India, her family would make Kanji using black (dark purple) carrots. If these carrots were unavailable, they’d add beetroot to help darken the color of the drink. This recipe uses both carrots and beets. In addition to these two vegetables, you’ll also need black/brown mustard seeds, fine sea salt and filtered water. These simple ingredients make for a unique and complex flavor.

Once you combine all of the ingredients together for this drink, put it in a glass container (I use a half-gallon mason jar) and keep it in a sunny spot inside the house. The amount of time required to create a ferment will depend on the temperature in your home, but this typically takes anywhere from 3 days to 1 week. If it’s colder, it’ll likely take an extra few days.

Taste the drink periodically to see if it’s done.

Once it’s nice and sour, strain it and put it in the fridge to chill. Make sure to save the carrots and beets, they’ll make for tasty pickles!


image of Congee - Wikipedia

Congee - Wikipedia

.
From: en.wikipedia.org

Type of rice porridge or gruel

Congee or conjee ( KON-jee) is a type of rice porridge or gruel eaten in Asian countries. When eaten as plain rice congee, it is most often served with side dishes. When additional ingredients such as meat, fish, and flavourings are added while preparing the congee, it is most often served as a meal on its own, especially for people who are ill. Names for congee are as varied as the style of its preparation. Despite its many variations, it is usually a thick porridge of rice largely disintegrated after prolonged cooking in water.

Etymology[edit]

The English word congee is derived from the Proto-Tamil-Malayalam word kanji (கஞ்சி, kanci, IPA: [ˈkaɲdʑiː]).[2] In Chinese, it is known as zhou (Chinese: 粥; pinyin: zhou; Cantonese Yale: juk). The earliest reference to rice porridge or congee can be traced back to the Chinese Zhou dynasty (circa 1000 BCE). It is also mentioned in the Book of Rites and noted in Pliny’s account of India circa 77 CE.[3]

Preparation[edit]

To prepare the dish, rice is boiled in a large amount of water until it softens significantly. Congee can be made in a pot or in a rice cooker. Some rice cookers have a "congee" setting, allowing it to be cooked overnight. The type of rice used can be either short- or long-grain, depending on what is available and regional cultural influences. Culture also often dictates the way congee is cooked and eaten.

In some cultures, congee is eaten primarily as a breakfast food or late supper; some may also eat it as a substitute for rice at other meals. It is often considered particularly suitable for the sick as a mild, easily digestible food.[4] Because of this, it is commonly served as a staple meal for patients in healthcare facilities.

Regional varieties[edit] East Asia[edit] China[edit]

While plain congee is a staple dish in China, it is called congee only in Hong Kong English but is more commonly recognised as juk. Natively, plain congee is known by other local names such as baizhou (Chinese: 白粥; lit. 'white porridge') in Central and Northern China.[5] Another common Chinese name for it in the Mandarin dialect is xifan (Chinese: 稀飯; lit. 'dilute rice').

Chinese congees (Chinese: 粥; pinyin: zhou; Cantonese Yale: juk) vary considerably by region. For example, to make Cantonese congee, white rice is boiled in many times its weight in water for a long time until the rice breaks down and becomes a fairly thick, white porridge.[6] Congees made in other regions may use different types of rice with different quantities of water, producing congees of different consistencies. It can be left watery, or cooked until it has a texture similar to Western oatmeal porridge. Congee can also be made from brown rice, although this is less common and takes longer to cook. Congee made from other grains, such as cornmeal, millet, barley, and sorghum, are common in the north of China where rice does not grow as well as other grains suited for a colder climate.[citation needed] Multigrain congee mixes are sold in the health food sections of Chinese supermarkets.

Savory congee, generally cooked with salt and often fresh ginger and other flavorful ingredients, is usually eaten with zhacai, salted duck eggs, lettuce and dace (Chinese mud carp paste), bamboo shoots, youtiao, rousong, pickled tofu, wheat gluten, with other condiments, meats and organ meats including tripe and intestine, crab or hundred-year eggs. Other seasonings such as white pepper and soy sauce may be added after the congee is cooked. Grilled or steamed and deboned fish may be mixed in to provide a different texture.

Plain congee is commonly eaten with youtiao (lightly salted fried crullers) as breakfast in many areas in China. Congee with mung beans is usually eaten with sugar, as is red bean congee, or in Laba congee.

Besides being an everyday meal, congee is considered to be food therapy for the unwell. Ingredients can be determined by their supposed therapeutic value as well as flavor. It is also used to feed infants.

The origin of congee is unknown, but from many historical accounts, it was usually served during times of famine, or when numerous patrons visited the temples,[citation needed] as a way to stretch the rice supply to feed more people.

The autumn porridge festival is celebrated by villagers eating congee together on that day, the meaning being that they pray for everything to go smoothly and to build a good relationship with the neighborhood. A village called Lingshuicun to the West of Beijing celebrates Liu Maoheng, a Qing-era Juren who helped villagers during a period of famine, through the autumn porridge festival.[7][8]

Taiwan[edit]

In Taiwan, congee is known as xifan (稀飯) or zhou(粥). Congee is often consumed for breakfast or as an easily digestible food for children and those who are ill. Sweet potato, taro root, or century egg is often added for taste. Ground pork is also a common ingredient added with century egg, creating the dish known as pidan shourou zhou(皮蛋瘦肉粥).[9]

Japan[edit]

Kayu (粥), or often okayu (お粥) is the name for the type of congee eaten in Japan,[10] which typically uses water to rice ratios of 5:1 or 7:1 and is cooked for about 30 minutes.

Kayu may be made with just rice and water, and is often seasoned with salt. Eggs can be beaten into it to thicken it into gruel. Toppings may be added to enhance flavour; Welsh onion, salmon, roe, ginger, and umeboshi (pickled ume fruit) are among the most common. Miso or chicken stock may be used to flavor the broth. Most Japanese electric rice cookers have a specific setting for cooking congee.

In Japan kayu – because it is soft and easily digestible – is regarded as a food particularly suitable for serving to invalids and the elderly.[11] For similar reasons kayu is commonly the first solid food served to Japanese infants; it is used to help with the transition from liquids to normally cooked "plain" rice, the latter being a major part of the Japanese diet.

A type of kayu referred to as nanakusa-gayu (七草粥, "seven herb porridge") is traditionally eaten on 7 January[12] with special herbs that some believe protect against evils and invite good luck and longevity in the new year. As a simple, light dish, nanakusa-gayu serves as a break from the many heavy dishes eaten over the Japanese New Year.

Kayu is also used in Shinto divination rituals.[13]

Zosui (雑炊) is a similar dish, which uses already cooked rice, rather than cooking the rice in the soup.

Korea[edit]

Juk (죽; 粥; [tɕuk̚]) is a Korean category for porridges made by boiling rice or other grains or legumes, such as beans, sesame, nuts, and pumpkin, with much more water than bap.[14] Juk is often eaten warm, especially as a morning meal, but is now eaten at any time of the day.[14]

Depending on the ingredients and consistency, juk can be considered as food for recuperation, a delicacy, or famine food.[15] It is known to have nutritional benefits, and is considered to be beneficial to digestion because of its soft texture. It is a staple "get well" dish; a dish to eat when one is sick or recovering from bad health.[16] Juk is also considered an ideal food for babies, the ill or elderly, as it is easily eaten and digested.[17] It is also sold commercially by many chain stores in South Korea, and is a common takeout dish.[18]

There are more than forty varieties of juk mentioned in old documents.[15] The most basic form of juk, made from plain rice, is called ssaljuk (쌀죽; 'rice porridge') or huinjuk (흰죽; 'white porridge'). Being largely unflavored, it is served with a number of more flavorful side dishes, such as jeotgal (salted seafood), various types of kimchi, and other side dishes.

Notable varieties include jatjuk made from finely ground pine nuts, jeonbok-juk made with abalones, yulmu-juk made from yulmu (Coix lacryma-jobi var. ma-yuen), and patjuk made from red beans.

The following list are examples of juk: Daechu-gom (대추곰) – jujube porridge, Dakjuk (닭죽) – chicken porridge, Euneo-juk (은어죽; 銀魚粥) – sweetfish porridge, Heugimja-juk (흑임자죽; 黑荏子粥) – black sesame porridge, Hobak-juk (호박죽) – pumpkin porridge, Jangguk-juk (장국죽) – beef porridge, Jatjuk (잣죽) – pine nut porridge, Jeonbok-juk (전복죽; 全鰒粥) – abalone rice porridge, Patjuk (팥죽) – red bean porridge, Tarak-juk (타락죽; 駝酪粥) – milk porridge.

Southeast Asia[edit] Myanmar[edit]

In Myanmar, rice congee is called hsan byoke or hsan pyoke, literally "(uncooked) rice boiled". It is plain porridge, often made with just rice and water, but sometimes with chicken or pork stock and served with a simple garnish of chopped spring onions and crispy fried onions.[citation needed]

Cambodia[edit]

In Khmer congee is called babor (បបរ). It is one of the options for breakfast along with kuy teav, another popular Cambodian breakfast dish.[19][20] Congee is eaten throughout Cambodia both in the countryside and in the cities.

Congee can be eaten plain or with a variety of side dishes and toppings such as soy sauce, added to enhance taste, as well as dried salted fish or fried breadsticks (ឆាខ្វៃ, cha kway).[21]

There are two main versions of congee: plain congee, and chicken congee (បបរមាន់, babor moən). It is usually eaten during the colder dry season or when someone is sick. After the congee is prepared a variety of toppings can be added to enhance the flavour such as bean sprouts, green onions, coriander, pepper, along with the dried fish and fried breadsticks on the side. The chicken congee is the same as plain congee but contains more herbs and chicken.[22][23]

Indonesia[edit]

In Indonesian, congee is called bubur, and it is a favourite breakfast food in the country.[24][25] Travelling bubur ayam vendors frequently pass through residential streets in the morning selling the dish.[24][26] A popular version is bubur ayam, which is rice congee with shredded chicken meat. It is also served with many condiments, such as green onion, crispy fried shallot, fried soybean, Chinese crullers (youtiao, known as cakwe in Indonesia), both salty and sweet soy sauce, and sometimes it is topped with yellow chicken broth and kerupuk (Indonesian style crackers). Unlike many other Indonesian dishes, it is not spicy; sambal or chili paste is served separately.

The food hawkers sometimes have sate to go with it, made from quail egg or chicken intestine, liver, gizzard, or heart.

On Bali's north coast, famously in a village called Bondalem, there is a local congee dish called mengguh, a popular local chicken and vegetable rice congee that is spicier than common bubur ayam and more similar to tinutuan, using a spice mix of onions, garlic, coriander seeds, pepper and chili.[27]

In another region of Indonesia — the city of Manado in North Sulawesi, there is a very popular type of congee called tinutuan, or also known as bubur Manado (Manadonese porridge). It is rice porridge served with ample amount of vegetables. A bit different from the one sold in Java, it is made from rice porridge, enriched with vegetables, including kangkung (water spinach), corn kernels, yam or sweet potato, dried salted fish, kemangi (lemon basil) leaves and melinjo (Gnetum gnemon) leaves.

Sago flour is made into porridge in eastern Indonesia, as the staple food of Maluku and Papuan people. The sago congee is called papeda, and usually is eaten with yellow soup made from tuna or mubara fish spiced with turmeric and lime.

Laos[edit]

In Laos, congee is called khao piak,[28] literally "wet rice" (Lao: ເຂົ້າປຽກ, IPA: [kʰaːo piːək]). It is cooked with rice and chicken broth or water. The congee is then garnished with fried garlic, scallions and pepper. The dish will sometimes be served with chicken, quail eggs, century eggs or youtiao. In Laos, congee is usually eaten as breakfast and during the cold season.

Malaysia[edit]

In Malaysia, congee is known simply as porridge when no distinction is required.

Philippines[edit]

Lugaw (pronounced Tagalog pronunciation: [ˈluɡaw]) is the Filipino generic term for rice gruel.[note 1][30] It encompasses a wide variety of dishes, ranging from savory dishes very similar to Chinese-style congee to dessert dishes. In the Visayan regions, savory lugaw are known as pospas. Lugaw typically use glutinous rice (Tagalog: malagkit; Visayan: pilit). It is usually thicker than other Asian congees, retaining the shape of the rice, yet with a similar texture.

Savory versions of lugaw are flavored with ginger and traditionally topped with scallions and toasted garlic. Dried red safflower (kasubha) may also be used as a topping, mainly as a visual garnish and to impart a more appealing yellow tinge to the dish. As with Japanese okayu, fish or chicken stock may be used to flavor the broth. The most popular variants of lugaw include arroz caldo (chicken), goto (beef tripe), lugaw na baboy (pork), lugaw na baka (beef), and lugaw na tokwa't baboy (diced tofu and pork). Other versions can also use tinapa (smoked fish), palaka (frog legs), utak (brain [of pig]), dila (tongue [of pig]), and litid ([beef] ligaments). They are traditionally seasoned with calamansi, fish sauce (patis), soy sauce (toyo), and black pepper. It is often served to the ill and the elderly, and is favored among Filipinos living in colder climates because it is warm, soft, and easy to digest.[31][32]

Dessert versions of lugaw include champorado (lugaw with home-made chocolate topped with milk), binignit (lugaw in coconut milk with various fruits and root crops), and ginataang mais (lugaw with sweet corn and coconut milk), among others. Like the savory versions, they are usually eaten for breakfast, but can also be eaten as a snack. In Hiligaynon-speaking areas, lugaw may refer to binignit.

Singapore[edit]

In Singapore, Teochew porridge or Singapore-style porridge is a version of Singapore congee.[33] In Singapore, it's considered a comfort food for both breakfast and supper. Teochew porridge dish often accompanied with various small plates of side dishes.[33] Usually, it's served as a banquet of meats, fish egg and vegetables eaten with plain rice porridge. The recipes that early immigrants prepared in Singapore have been modified over the generations to suit local tastes. Singapore Teochew style porridge is usually consumed with a selection of Singaporean Chinese side dishes like Nasi Padang. There is no fixed list of side dishes, but in Singapore, accompaniments typically include lor bak (braised pork), steamed fish, stir-fried water spinach (kangkong goreng), salted egg, fish cake, tofu, omelette, minced meat, braised tau kway, Hei Bee Hiang (fried shrimp chilli paste), and vegetables.[34]

Thailand[edit]

In Thai cuisine, rice congee, known as Chok or Jok (Thai: โจ๊ก, IPA: [tɕoːk], a loanword from Min Nan Chinese), is often served as breakfast with a raw or partially cooked egg added.[35] Minced pork or beef and chopped spring onions are usually added, and the dish is optionally topped with a small donut-like pathongko, fried garlic, slivered ginger, and spicy pickles such as pickled radish. Although it is more popular as a breakfast dish, many stores specializing in Jok sell it throughout the day. Variations in the meat and toppings are also frequently found. It is especially popular during Thailand's cool season.

Plain rice congee, known as khao tom kui (Thai: ข้าวต้มกุ๊ย), is served at specialty restaurants, which serve a multitude of side dishes to go with it, such as yam kun chiang (a Thai salad made with sliced dried Chinese sausages), mu phalo (pork stewed in soy sauce and five-spice powder), and mu nam liap (minced pork fried with chopped Chinese olives).

Notable Jok eateries in Bangkok can be found in areas like Bang Rak on Charoen Krung, home to Jok Prince which received the Bib Gourmand from Michelin Guidebook,[36] Talat Noi in Chinatown beside Wat Traimit near Hua Lamphong,[37] and the Jok Chai neighbourhood in Lat Phrao, where the dish is available 24 hours a day.[38] Khao tom kui is found in areas such as the Yaowarat and Wong Wian Yi Sip Song Karakadakhom (July 22 Circle) neighbourhoods.[39][40]

In a popular reference within the 2011 US comedy film The Hangover Part II set in Thailand, Jok is described as being a food for ″small babies and very old people″ with ″no taste″ that is nourishment ″everybody can digest″. The reference is used to describe the character of the protagonist Stu Price (portrayed by Ed Helms).

Vietnam[edit]

In Vietnam, rice congee, called chao (Vietnamese: chao),[41] is sometimes cooked with pandan leaves or Asian mung bean. In its simplest form (plain rice porridge, known as chao hoa),[42] it is a food for times of famine and hardship to stretch the rice ration. Alternately, as is especially common among Buddhist monks, nuns and lay persons, it can be a simple breakfast food eaten with pickled vegetables or fermented tofu (chao).

Despite its ubiquity among the poor, it is also popular as a main dish when cooked with a variety of meats. For example, chao ga is cooked with chicken, garlic, and ginger. The rice porridge is cooked in chicken broth, and when the chicken is cooked, the meat is sliced and layered on a bed of shredded raw cabbage and sliced scallions and drizzled with a vinegar-based sauce, to be eaten as a side dish. Other combinations include chao vit (duck porridge), which is cooked in the same manner as chicken porridge. Chao long heo is made with long heo, a variety of offal from pork or duck with sliced portions of congealed pork blood. Chao is typically served with quay on the side.

Chao bau duc is a congee containing pig kidney (bau duc lon). A specialty of the Hoc Mon District in Ho Chi Minh City, it is typically eaten in rural areas of southern Vietnam. Well-known chao bau vendors include Canh Dong Hoang, Co Ba Nu, and Sau Quen.[43] Another typical Vietnamese dish is chao nam, a congee with mushrooms.[44]

Youtiao is usually added to congee especially at congee vendors.

It is also common to eat chao when ill, as it is believed the porridge is easy to digest while being fortifying. For such purposes, the chao is sometimes cooked with roasted white rice, giving the porridge broth a more nuanced body and a subtle, nutty flavor. In some parts of Vietnam, local customs call for making chao as offerings for the "wandering souls" during the Buddhist Vu Lan summer feast.

South Asia[edit] India[edit]

In Karnataka a plain rice porridge, or the thick supernatant water from overcooked rice, is known as ganji (ಗಂಜಿ).[45] Kanji is also prepared with different grains available in different parts of Karnataka, for example minor millet or pearl millet,[46][47] finger millet,[48] broken wheat, maize. In Kerala it is eaten as a porridge with green lentils or chutney.[citation needed] Kanji is prepared with rice or ragi. Nuts and spices are added to the kanji depending on the economic status or health requirements. Rice kanji is prepared by boiling rice in large amounts of water. To this preparation, either milk and sugar (usually jaggery) or curd (yoghurt) and salt are added. Ragi kanji is prepared by drying ragi sprouts in shade, and then grinding them into a smooth powder. This powder is added to water and cooked. Milk and brown sugar are added to this cooked preparation for taste. Ragi kanji can be given to infants after six months. Another kanji preparation uses jevvarisi (sago) in kanji. Sago is dry roasted and powdered with/ without sugar. Powdered sago is boiled in water until cooked. This is eaten by all ages from adults to infants as young as three months.

In the Konkan region of India, congee is known as pez, is a home remedy for treating a fever as it is easy to digest. The farming and manual labour community of the same region, on the other hand, consume on a daily basis in the late morning as a source of energy. Variants of the dish include nachnyachi pez (ambil[what language is this?]) which is made with ragi and rice, athwal or metheachi pez is a sweeter version which is made with rice, fenugreek and jaggery, which is usually served to a nursing mother. The rice here is usually eaten boiled, with dry fish, vegetables or pickles.[49]

In the state of Kerala, kanji used to be considered as a main course, particularly for dinner, by the majority. It is still popular, although usually only eaten regularly by those lower down the socio-economic ladder. This is normally taken with roasted coconut chutney, tossed mung bean known locally as payar, roasted pappadam (lentil crackers), puzhukku (a side dish consisting mainly of root tubers/underground stems, especially during Thiruvathira); sometimes coconut scrapings are also added to the kanji to increase the flavour. The royal households as well as rich people used to have a special kind of kanji called as palkanji (lit. 'milk congee') where milk was substituted for water base.[50] During the Malayalam month of Karkkidakam, a medicinal kanji is made using Ayurvedic herbs, milk and jaggery. Karkkidakam is known as the month of diseases since the monsoon starts during Karkkidakam. Karikkidaka kanji is eaten to promote the immune system.[51]

Poor households of Kerala used to re-cook leftover rice and all available leftover curries into congee water and take as a mix-mash dish known as pazhamkanji (old congee).[52]

Pazhamkanji means old congee (leftover from the previous day). It is not necessarily eaten by poor people, neither it is necessarily re-heated with leftover curries.

According to the Indian writer Madhur Jaffrey, kanji is, or derives from, a Tamil word for "boiling"—which refers to the porridge and also to any water in which rice has been cooked.[citation needed]

Muslims of south India especially Tamil Muslim, Mappila and Beary prepare special congee during Ramadhan called nombu kanj (lit. 'fasting porridge'). This is prepared by adding spices like turmeric, dry ginger, pepper, onion, and coconut paste to the congee. Sometimes fenugreek seeds are added to it to enhance the flavour.

In Goa state and Udupi and Dakshina Kannada districts, people usually eat rice ganji in a variant manner made by Kannada-speaking, Tulu-speaking or Konkani people in and around Udupi and Mangalore (Karnataka, South India). There, parboiled rice (kocheel akki in Kannada, oorpel aari for black rice, bolenta aari for white rice in Tulu or ukde tandool in Konkani) is steamed with a large amount of water. Jain ganji matt are famous in these districts. Usually, simple ganji with pickle and milk are served, in jain matts. Fresh coconut is grated, and the resulting milk skimmed and added to the ganji (called paez or pyaaz in Konkani), which is served hot with fish curry, coconut chutney, or Indian pickles. In Goa, it is normally served with dried or fresh cooked fish, papad or vegetables.[citation needed]

In the state of Andhra Pradesh, it is called ganji in Telugu. Ganji is made by boiling rice in large amounts of water and then the filtered liquid is known as Ganji. Ganji mixed with buttermilk is believed to add to the flavor, and is also suggested by doctors for patients with ailing health.

Kaanji is a traditional Odia dish. It is a soup-based dish like dal, but tastes a little sour. It is made of rice starch fermented for a few days in an earthen pot. This is considered a healthy dish as many winter vegetables are used as main ingredients. It is seasoned with mustard seeds and turmeric and served hot.[citation needed]. Pakhala is a separate dish with certain similarities to the congee.

In the Buddhist Yagu Sutta of the Aṅguttara Nikaya (AN 5.207), the Buddha recommends eating rice porridge, "yagu": "There are these five benefits in rice porridge. What five? It stills hunger, dispels thirst, settles wind, cleans out the bladder, and promotes the digestion of the remnants of undigested food. These are the five benefits of rice porridge.".[53]

Sri Lanka[edit]

In Sri Lanka, several types of congee are known as kenda in Sinhalese.[54] Sinhala people use congee as a breakfast, a side dish, an accessory to indigenous medical therapies,[55] and a sweet. Kenda can be prepared with many ingredients, including rice, roasted rice, rice flour, finger millet flour, sago, coconut milk, herbs, tubers, kitul flour, and mung bean. When it is prepared with rice and water only, it is known as hal kenda. If salt is added to bring a much saltier taste, it is known as lunu kenda, a dish commonly used as a supplementary diet in purgation therapy in indigenous medical traditions. If roasted rice is used, the congee becomes bendi hal kenda, utilized to treat diarrheal diseases. If rice flour and coconut milk are the main ingredients, such congee is known as kiriya. If finger millet flour and water is used, it is known as kurakkan anama. If coconut milk is added, the dish is called kurakkan kenda. If sago is used, such congee is known as sawu kenda. A special type of congee prepared from the byproducts of coconut oil production is known as pol kiri kenda. There are many varieties of kola kenda, congee with herbs as an ingredient; sometimes, a vaidya or veda mahttaya (a physician trained in indigenous medical traditions) might prescribe a special type of kola kenda, known under such circumstances as behet kenda. Sinhala villagers use specific tubers for preparing congee, such as Diascorea species tubers. If kitul flour is mixed with boiling water and coconut milk added to it, this special type of congee is known as kitul piti kenda. Kenda prepared with mung beans is known as mung eta kenda.

Most of the time, kiriya, kurakkan kenda, sawu kenda, pol kiri kenda and kitul piti kenda are used as sweets. Sugar, candy, dates, raisins, cashew nut, jaggery, and treacle are among the ingredients that may be added to sweeten these congees.

Congee is also eaten by Sri Lankan Moors for iftar during Ramadan. It is also occasionally made with oats. Tamils and Moors in Sri Lanka call it arisi kanji (rice kanji) and may use chicken or beef for it. It is just as often made with milk (paal kanji), and there are many other combinations with appropriate prefixes in Tamil; One very special type being 'Chithirai' kanji, Chithirai being the Tamil month coinciding with April/May, made for a festival in this month. It is a salty simple kanji with green chilis, onions and coconut milk.

Europe[edit] Portugal[edit]

In Portugal, a traditional soup made of rice and chicken meat is named canja or Canja de galinha. The Portuguese likely picked up the dish from their colonies in Western/Southern India or Srilanka; where the soup remains a staple (particularly for the ill). The rice is not cooked for as long as in Asian congee, so it is very soft, but not disintegrated. Traditionally, a boiling fowl containing small, immature eggs is used; the eggs are carefully boiled and served in the canja. This soup is sometimes served with a fresh mint leaf on top. Strongly valued as comfort food, it is traditionally given to people recovering from disease, as in Asia, and in some regions of Portugal, there is even a custom of feeding the mother a strict diet of canja in the first weeks after childbirth. It is also eaten traditionally in Brazil and Cape Verde, former Portuguese colonies.

See also[edit] Notes[edit] References[edit] External links[edit]


The 214 traditional kanji radicals and their meanings

322 rows · Nov 02, 2013 · Kanji are classified in kanji dictionaries according to their main …Kanji are classified by their radicals (roots) or 部首. The table shows all the kanji radicals with their meanings, positions, stroke numbers and readings..
From: kanjialive.com

Kanji are classified in kanji dictionaries according to their main components which are called radicals (roots) in English and 部首 (ぶしゅ) in Japanese. 部 (ぶ) means a group and 首 (しゅ) means a chief (head/neck). There are 214 historical radicals derived from the 18th century Kangxi dictionary.

Every kanji without exception only has one radical / 部首 (ぶしゅ). Each radical has a meaning(s) and lends its meaning(s) to the kanji of which it is part. Please take a look at the examples below. The right part of these three kanji is the same but the left part is different. The left part of these kanji is their radical. Note how each radical imparts its meaning to the kanji:

時:  The radical of this kanji is 日 (sun, day, time). The meaning of this kanji is “time.”
詩:  The radical of this kanji is 言 (words, to speak, say). The meaning of this kanji is “poetry, poem”.
持:  The radical of this kanji is 扌(hand). The meaning of this kanji is “to hold”.

For this reason it is very important to learn each kanji’s radical, as well as the meaning(s) of its radical. Not all 214 radicals are in use in current Japanese but you will soon become familiar with the most important ones and their variants.

There are no official Japanese names for radicals. But there are certain commonly-used names. That is why you will find differences in the Japanese names for the radicals on different websites and dictionaries.

Radicals are categorized into seven main groups according to their position within a kanji. Please note that some kanji are also radicals in and of themselves (such as 大, 日, 月). In those cases, the kanji and the radical are one and the same, and thus the position of the radical in the kanji is irrelevant. As a result they do not fall into any one of the seven categories.

With our web application (https://app.kanjialive.com) you can search for kanji by radical name, stroke, meaning or position using the Advanced Search syntax (for example, rjn:miru or rjn:みる to search by Japanese name, rs:7 to search by stroke number, rem:see to search by English meaning, and rpos:かんむり or rpos:tsukuri to search for kanji by the position of the radical). Please consult our User Guide to learn about additional search options.

Tip: By default, the radicals in the list below are presented in ascending stroke order. However you can also focus on a specific stroke number or look for individual radicals by using the “Search” field at the top of the table. Alternatively you can click on a column heading to sort the entire table by that heading. This is also a good way to focus on just the most important radicals. Clicking on the “a variant of..” link scrolls the page to the original version of that radical.

Tip: You can also use the table’s own search field to search/filter radicals by position. Use the radical positions table as a reference. For example, to view all radicals in the “hang down” position, type たれ or “tare” into the search field. To avoid ambiguities amongst the different kinds of “enclosed” radicals, search for these in hiragana. Placing your mouse pointer over any position symbol in the radical table reveals its Japanese name.

Fonts: Many of the radical characters shown on this list are not supported by the Japanese fonts widely used on Windows, OS X or Linux (some not even in Unicode). For these reasons we created Japanese Radicals, an open-source font derived from Source Han Sans with 60 custom glyphs which add support for every Japanese radical and variant. The font is freely available for private or commercial use.

Tip: If you’d like a copy of the radicals tables in a format better suited for printing or if you’d like to re-use this data in another application, please visit our open-source repository on GitHub. Most of the language data and media files used in Kanji alive are freely available under a Creative Commons CC-BY license.

References:

The English meanings of each radical in Kanji alive are based on Kanji & Kana by Wolfgang Hadamitzky & Mark Spahn, (1981), Tuttle Publishing with additional reference to Basic Kanji by Matsuo Soga & Michio Yusa (1989), Taishukan, and Andrew N. Nelson, The Original Modern Reader’s Japanese-English Character Dictionary: Classic Edition, 2nd. ed. (1974), Tuttle Publishing. The Japanese names for the radicals are based on『講談社カラー版日本語大辞典』(第一版)1989, 講談社.

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image of Gajar Kanji - A Probtioc Drink Made with Fermented Water ...

Gajar Kanji - A Probtioc Drink Made with Fermented Water ...

Mar 03, 2015 · Kanji water has to be pickled in either traditional Martbaan or A Clean Sterilized Glass Jar. It is fermented in sun for 2-3 days for best effective results. The consumable parts of Kanji are both the Fermented Probiotic Water and the Pickled carrots and Beets as well.Gajar Kanji is the Naturally Fermented Drink from the Northern Part of India, made during the festival of Holi. It is made with few easily available Pickling Ingredients. Kanji is the true form of Probiotic and is as effective as kombucha. It is great for Gut and Stomach Health..
From: simplyvegetarian777.com

Gajar Kanji is the Naturally Fermented Drink from the Northern Part of India. It is made with few easily available Pickling Ingredients. Kanji is the true form of Probiotic and is as effective as kombucha.

Gajar Kanji 

Holi is the festival that celebrates Spring. When Winter is closing down, spring brings a lot of sunlight, brightness, happy faces and a lot of allergies along with it. In times like such, Kanji is a must-make HOLI drink.

Kanji is a fermented drink and rich in Vitamin C, hence very good for digestion and stomach health.

 3 kinds of kanji are prepared in my town –

For Gajar Kanji, the flavors are obtained from the carrots and beets fermented in plain water along with coarsely ground Mustard, Red chili powder, and salt! Mostly dark pigmented carrots are used or deep red colored carrots are used. Since it is difficult to find dark color carrots in America, I add beets to Kanji to obtain rich color and flavor.

Few Important Facts to Know to Make Kanji

Some HOLI RECIPES from Blog are- Gujiya/Karanji , Dahi Wada (not deep fried), Chidwa Namkeen  and more.

This is how to make Gajar Kanji.

Yields – 12 cups or 3 liters 

Kitchen Equipment Required – A glass jar or clay jar with loose cover, chopping board and knife, a wooden spoon to stir.

Ingredients

Water – 12 cups or 3 liters. Filtered water preferred or boil and cool it to the room temperature before using.

Mustard powder / Rai Kuria / Coarsely ground yellow mustard – 6 tbsp

Red Chili powder – 3 tsp or less to taste

Salt – 3 tbsp or to taste

Carrots – 5 to 6

Beets – 3 to 4

Have a Great HOLI this year and enjoy with Kanji.


4 reasons you must drink rice water or kanji every day ...

Sep 11, 2015 · Is a good source of energy: Kanji or rice water is rich in carbohydrates, and hence, an excellent source of energy. The body can easily derive energy by …...And you thought it was only to drink when you were ill! TheHealthSite.com.
Keyword: Health benefits, Rice
From: www.thehealthsite.com


image of Kanji: The Miracle Winter Drink You Should Have for a ...

Kanji: The Miracle Winter Drink You Should Have for a ...

Nov 27, 2017 · Kanji making is the work of andaz. No measures can be given on how much water must submerge the carrots, including those beautiful purple ones, kaali gajjjar that comes only during winters, and...Kanji making is the work of andaz. No measures can be given on how much water must submerge the carrots, including those beautiful purple ones, kaali gajjjar that comes only during winters, and imparts a rich reddish hue to the drink, is never strictly measured..
Keyword: carrots, winter, drink
From: food.ndtv.com


image of Kanji Recipe (Step by Step   Video) Holi special - Whiskaffair

Kanji Recipe (Step by Step Video) Holi special - Whiskaffair

Mar 17, 2021 · Open the cloth and give it a stir. Refrigerate it for 2-3 hours before serving. Serve kanji in glasses along with a few pieces of carrots in each glass. Pro Tips by Neha. You can …Kanji recipe is a traditional north Indian drink made by fermenting carrots in water and spices. It comes together in under 15 minutes..
From: www.whiskaffair.com


image of Genuine Be Like Water in Chinese & Japanese Kanji

Genuine Be Like Water in Chinese & Japanese Kanji

2 days ago · Mind Like Water. Mizu No Kokoro. mizu no kokoro. 水の心 is the Japanese Buddhist and martial arts phrase, "mizu no kokoro", which means, "mind like water" or "heart of water". The phrase is a metaphor describing the pond that clearly reflects it's surroundings when calm but whose images are obscured once a pebble is dropped into its waters.Amazing Be Like Water Custom Wall Scrolls in Chinese or Japanese. We create handcrafted Be Like Water calligraphy wall scrolls at discount prices..
Keyword: Search for Be Like Water Japanese Chinese Calligraphy Character symbols letters
From: www.orientaloutpost.com


image of Kanji Vada Recipe (Step by Step   Video) - Whiskaffair

Kanji Vada Recipe (Step by Step Video) - Whiskaffair

Mar 11, 2020 · For Kanji: Boil the water and let it cool for some time. Add salt, turmeric powder, red chili powder, and mustard powder in the water. Transfer the Kanji in a glass jar and cover …Kanji Vada is a traditional Rajasthani dish where lentil fritters are added in a mustard fermented water. It is a must make for Holi..
From: www.whiskaffair.com


image of Water | Kanji Wiki | Fandom

Water | Kanji Wiki | Fandom

Mizu means water. Try to avoid confusions with Hi nd Ki. Compared to the kanjis Hi and Ki, this kanji has 2 syllables, unlike the two having 1. But the three has their first syllable (but in the case of Hi and Ki, you can say this as their only syllable) ending in the letter i.Mizu means water. Try to avoid confusions with Hi nd Ki. Compared to the kanjis Hi and Ki, this kanji has 2 syllables, unlike the two having 1. But the three has their first syllable (but in the case of Hi and Ki, you can say this as their only syllable) ending in the letter i..
From: kanji.fandom.com


水 Kanji Detail - Kanshudo

水 is a Japanese kanji that means water. 水 has 4 strokes, and is the 146th most common kanji in Japanese. Learn about 水 on Kanshudo.水 is a Japanese kanji that means water. 水 has 4 strokes, and is the 146th most common kanji in Japanese. Learn about 水 on Kanshudo..
Keyword: learn kanji, learn japanese kanji, learn japanese kanji online, learn japanese, learn written japanese, japanese grammar, learn japanese grammar, written japanese, mastery japanese, master kanji, master japanese kanji, easy way to learn japanese kanji, learn japan language, how to learn kanji, japan language, learn japanese online free, learning japanese kanji online
From: www.kanshudo.com


image of WaniKani / Kanji / 水

WaniKani / Kanji / 水

The water radical and the water kanji are the same. Hints. So as long as you know the radicals, you know the kanji. Readings. On’yomi. すい Kun’yomi. みず Nanori. None Mnemonic. Imagine a lake (i.e. a whole bunch of water). When you think of …WaniKani is a Japanese radicals, kanji, and vocabulary learning web app that uses mnemonics and SRS to make kanji learning simple..
Keyword: japanese kanji, japanese language, japanese learning, kanji, radicals, kanji radicals, japanese vocabulary, vocabulary, srs, spaced repetition, mnemonics, memory tricks, web app
From: www.wanikani.com


水 | Learn Japanese Online - Free Lessons Makoto Membership

Kanji: 水 mizu waterSqueeze a river (川) and you get water.JLPT N5: 24 / 100 | 4 Strokes水On: スイKun: みずMeaning: waterThis kanji as a radical often looks like氵 and is found with kanji dealing with water.Stroke Order:Examples:大水 oo mizu - flood 水着 mizu gi - swimsuit, bathing suit水曜日 sui you bi - Wedn ...Kanji: 水 mizu waterSqueeze a river (川) and you get water.JLPT N5: 24 / 100 | 4 Strokes水On: スイKun: みずMeaning: waterThis kanji as a radical often looks like氵 and is found with kanji dealing with water.Stroke Order:Examples:大水 oo mizu - flood 水着 mizu gi - swimsuit, bathing suit水曜日 sui you bi - Wedn ....
From: thejapanesepage.com


Kanji details for 水 - JapanDict: Japanese Dictionary

One single kanji may have more than one different readings. In Japanese, these readings are classified in three different groups: On'yomi, Kun'yomi and Nanori. On'yomi. The reading is coming from the original Chinese pronunciation of the character. It's commonly used in multi-kanji compound words and usually written in katakana..
From: www.japandict.com


Handwritten kanji search at sljfaq.org

Draw a kanji in the box with the mouse. The computer will try to recognize it. Be careful about drawing strokes in the correct order and direction. Look ahead (don't match exactly) Ignore stroke order: The computer will write the top twenty kanji which it thinks match your drawing below. The best match is on the left..
From: kanji.sljfaq.org


image of Kanji Card – 水 – NIHONGO ICHIBAN

Kanji Card – 水 – NIHONGO ICHIBAN

Mar 24, 2011 · Meaning: water Onyomi: SUI Kunyomi: mizu Strokes: 4 Vocabulary: お水 – o mizu – water (“o” is an honoric prefix commonly used in front of water). 水曜日 – wednesday. 水道 – suidou – water pipe        Meaning: water Onyomi: SUI Kunyomi: mizu Strokes: 4 Vocabulary: お水 – o mizu – water (“o” is an honoric prefix commonly used in front of water) 水曜….
From: nihongoichiban.com


image of Kanji Drink Benefits: Why you should have miracle drink ...

Kanji Drink Benefits: Why you should have miracle drink ...

Dec 08, 2021 · Kanji Health Benefits: Kanji, popularly known as the miracle drink, is a fermented drink, originating from the Indian subcontinent, and is made with water, black carrots, beetroot, mustard seeds ...Kanji Health Benefits: Kanji, popularly known as the miracle drink, is a fermented drink, originating from the Indian subcontinent, and is made with water, black carrots, beetroot, mustard seeds and black pepper and much more on Times Of India.
Keyword: winter foods and kanji, why to drink kanji in winters, what is kanji, how to make kanji, benefits of kanji
From: timesofindia.indiatimes.com


Learn Japanese Kanji - Water (水) - YouTube

Learn the Kanji Water (水) stroke order with easy to remember vocabulary. 💧 💦Kun-yomi: MI ZU (みず)On-yomi: SU I (スイ)Subscribe to our KCP NihonGO! channel for....
From: www.youtube.com


How to Write Five Elements in Japanese Kanji

How are the five elements depicted in Japanese kanji symbols? See how the classical Chinese wu xing are rendered as well as the godai of Japan..
From: www.thoughtco.com


image of WaniKani / Radical / Water - WaniKani, a kanji learning ...

WaniKani / Radical / Water - WaniKani, a kanji learning ...

WaniKani is a Japanese radicals, kanji, and vocabulary learning web app that uses mnemonics and SRS to make kanji learning simple. Learn Japanese kanji the effective way! ... That's why this radical is water. Found In Kanji.WaniKani is a Japanese radicals, kanji, and vocabulary learning web app that uses mnemonics and SRS to make kanji learning simple..
Keyword: japanese kanji, japanese language, japanese learning, kanji, radicals, kanji radicals, japanese vocabulary, vocabulary, srs, spaced repetition, mnemonics, memory tricks, web app
From: www.wanikani.com


Kanji of water | japanese in hindi | Learn Kanji | Kanji ...

One may start learning japanese from the Hiragana, Katakana and Kanji. Hiragana is the basic script of the Japanese Language. Once you learn Hiragana script ....
From: www.youtube.com


image of Summer Special: 5 Amazing Benefits Of Nourishing Kanji

Summer Special: 5 Amazing Benefits Of Nourishing Kanji

A burst of energy: Kanji or grain water is rich in energy-rich carbohydrates. Simply have a glass in the morning before heading out and you will not feel dizzy or weak at all. Simply have a glass in the morning before heading out and you will not feel dizzy or weak at all.Plus, we list 6 different types of kanjis that you can make at home. Read on to know more about the amazing benefits of kanji.
From: www.theindusparent.com


image of Kanji Water Bottles - CafePress

Kanji Water Bottles - CafePress

Japanese Kanji Love Symbol over Mount Fuji Water B. $19.99 $25.99. Tai Chi form and kangi Stainless Water Bottle 1.0L. $19.99 $25.99. Strength in Japanese K Stainless Water Bottle 1.0L. $19.99 $25.99. Wado Kai Karate Gold Stainless Water Bottle 1.0L. $19.99 $25.99. Its An Anime Thing Stainless Water Bottle 1.0L.Shop CafePress for Kanji Water Bottles. Find great designs on high quality durable Stainless Steel Water Bottles and Sport Bottles. ✓Free Returns ✓100% Satisfaction Guarantee ✓Fast Shipping.
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