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taiwanese black pepper bun

10 of almost 30 closest search results for keyword taiwanese black pepper bun by the administrator of realrecipesus.fun will make you happy.

image of The Legendary Raohe Night Market Black Pepper Bun Taiwan ...

The Legendary Raohe Night Market Black Pepper Bun Taiwan ...

Pork black pepper buns are a very popular food to eat in Taipei, with good reason. It’s crispy and flaky on the outside, juicy and full of flavor on the inside. If you’ve read any Taipei food guide or have seen Food Wars, the black pepper bun is a food you should try!Pork black pepper buns are a very popular food to eat in Taipei, with good reason. It’s crispy and flaky on the outside, juicy and full of flavor.
From: blorg.org

Pork black pepper buns are a very popular food to eat in Taipei, with good reason. It’s crispy and flaky on the outside, juicy and full of flavor on the inside. If you’ve read any Taipei food guide or have seen Food Wars, the black pepper bun is a food you should try!

What is a black pepper bun?

Hujiao bing or Pepper bun (Chinese: 胡椒餅; pinyin: Hujiao bing; Pe̍h-oe-ji: ho͘-chio-piaⁿ; literally: ‘black pepper cake or biscuit’) is a type of baked bun that originated in city of Fuzhou, the capital of China’s Fujian province. It is a street food that has become quite popular in Taiwan and can be found in night markets or mini food stalls throughout Taiwan. The common ingredients are flour, water, and a leavening agent for the outer dough shell, and a meat protein (usually pork or beef) marinated with sugar, soy sauce, white pepper or black pepper, and scallion for the inside filling.

Via Wikipedia

Why is it popular?

It’s in the Michelin guide classified in the bib gourmand section for affordable street food. Michelin rating are some of the most respected ratings a restaurant could get. Just being on the list means that restaurant is going to have amazing food!

Although some places are Michelin rated, when they become chain restaurants it’s difficult to maintain the high quality of the original. I’ve seen this first hand with places like Hawker Chan and Tim Ho Wan.

On the flip side, I’ve also been to places that are not Michelin rated and they’ve been incredibly delicious.

Black pepper buns were also featured on the anime Shokugeki no Soma (Food Wars). The Food Wars Black Pepper bun is pretty much exactly what you could expect. My reaction was similar, but please keep your clothes on. If you watch Shokugeki no Soma (Food Wars), you’ll understand that when a character really likes a food, they internally go to a new dimension of deliciousness were their clothes explode.

Where Do I Get The Black Pepper Buns in Taiwan?

The most popular place is in Raohe Street Night Market. It’s right at the entranceand most people get there via Songshan MRT station.

How Delicious Are The Pork buns?

8/10 for overall deliciousness. It’s juicy, crispy, flaky and full of flavor. It’s not filling as a meal, but great for a snack when on-the-go.

How Do You Eat A Black Pepper Buns?

SLOWLY. It’s also going to be SUPER hot. The bun holds in all the flavor and the heat. When you get these baked pork buns, they literally come out right from the oven. It will be difficult to even hold in your hand for the first 15 minutes, that’s how hot it is!

Then you take a SMALL bite of the exterior to begin letting some of the heat out. Don’t take a big bite because you may burn yourself with that level of heat.

Lastly, don’t wait for this thing to cool down. The longer you wait, the more the pork bun cooks. It changes from having a thin, crispy, flaky exterior to having a hard exterior (like a bagel). For optimal flavor, eat the black pepper pork bun as soon as you can take the heat.

How Much Is It?

Each black pepper bun is only $50 NTD ($1.62 USD) at Raohe night market. Don’t worry if you don’t speak the language. Just use your fingers to indicate how many you want. They only sell pork black pepper buns so you can’t accidentally order anything else.

What should I expect when I get there?

Expect a line! If you don’t get to Raohe night market once they open, the expected wait time is 30-90 minutes during primetime hours 7-9pm. Personally, I wouldn’t wait more than 30 minutes for black pepper pork bun. It’s good, but not “wait over 1-hour good.” If you really want one, check out my recommendation at the bottom of this post.

Roahe street night market is a collection of street stalls, restaurants and shopping. The black pepper bun is sold from a street stall. Once you make your purchase and get your food, you get out of line. There’s no seating for customers at this stall. Since this is street food, you eat it on the street.

If you’re a messy eater, be sure to grab a napkin before leaving the stall.

How Many Black Pepper Buns Should I Buy At Raohe Street Market?

Just one. If you’re trying to get a full meal, about 3-4 of these will fill an average adult. But this is Raohe Street Night Market! There’s so much other food! You SHOULD only buy one and then try other foods. It will probably take you at least 30 minutes to walk to the other end of Raohe nightmarket.

How Do I Get To Raohe Street Night Market? Songshan Station To Raohe Night Market

The easiest way is by MRT. If you take the green line to Songshan station, there’s a Raohe Night Market MRT exit. As soon as you exit, you’ll be right at the entrance to Raohe street market.

Where else can I get these Taiwanese Buns?

It’s actually very difficult to make these Taiwanese buns, because you need a Chinese oven. I’ve seen less than 5 places selling black pepper buns in Taiwan (and I’ve been here for 6 months). There have been other places I’ve tried, and even though Taipei Food Guides tell you about the one in Raohe night market, there’s also a branch by Taipei Main Station!

Fuzhou Ancestral Pepper Cake (Black pepper bun Taiwan)

By Taipei Main Station, visit 福州世祖胡椒餅 (Fuzhou Ancestral Pepper Cake) and get their delicious black pepper pork bun for $55 NTD ($1.78 USD). I know, it doesn’t have a Michelin star and isn’t as well known as the one in Raohe Night Market, but it’s just as good! The bonus is, this place is open all day! From 11am to 9pm every day. The typical wait time here is 0-15 minutes.

If I were to compare the black pepper pork buns at Raohe street market and at Taipei Main Station, I would rate them both an 8/10 on deliciousness. It’s a very satisfying snack, but not enough for a full meal. Eating 3-4 of these for a full meal is too much meat and bread for me.

Conclusion

Black pepper pork buns are delicious. Not many street vendors offer this food in Taipei, because it’s difficult to move around with a large Chinese oven. The few that do make pork buns, have to do a good job to maintain their street credibility.

With an average price of $50-55 NTD (Less than $2 USD) you can try one of Taipei’s best street food at Raohe Street Market or by Taipei Main Station.

If you’re on a diet, don’t watch Food Wars (Shokugeki no Soma). They teach you about all the delicious foods in the world with an entertaining story of cooks learning to make the best food in the world.

Are there any foods in Taipei that you love or plan on trying? What’s on your Taipei Food Guide?

For more Taipei related activities, check out all my Taipei Travel Posts.


image of Taiwanese Pepper Bun (胡椒餅) - It's My Dish

Taiwanese Pepper Bun (胡椒餅) - It's My Dish

Trader Joe’s pizza dough is so versatile you can make a Taiwanese Pepper Bun with ease. This recipe brings the delicious street food to your kitchen..
From: www.itsmydish.com

pepper bun - finalWhat I love about our Mike vs Jeff series is that we always strive to challenge ourselves to do something that we’ve never done before. Many people make it look easy on tv but a lot of techniques takes countless trial and error and sometimes, we may even have to toss out an idea. Well, recently, there is a lot of chatter in the air about using pizza dough to make awesome snacks, particularly Trader Joe’s fresh pizza dough because it’s more flexible in its usage. Well, there is a group of Chinese/Taiwanese Trader Joe’s die-hard fans that have been successful in creating various Chinese snacks ranging from sesame bread (芝麻大餅),  scallion pancakes (蔥油餅), gua-bao (open face pork bun) (刈包), steamed fried bun (生煎包/水煎包), beef-filled bun (牛肉餡餅), and pepper bun (胡椒餅). pepper bun - closeupWhile Jeff chose to make steam fried bun, I’m making pepper bun because I prefer baked buns rather than steamed buns. Even though I spent a good deal of my childhood in Taiwan and having traveled there about 10 times since moving to America, I’ve never eaten a pepper bun until my most recent trip there a few years ago. I can’t believe I wasted half of my life without trying this delicious street snack that has the wonderful aroma of toasted sesame seeds on a chewy yet flaky bun with juicy pork and green onion filling that packs a punch of heat from black and white peppers. In the future, every time I go visit Taiwan, I must have at least a pepper bun. My next trip to Taiwan is to try the famous street vendor at the Raohe Street night market in Taipei that produces authentic Fuzhou style pepper buns. I hear the line is long but it’s worth the wait. Even though it’s a street vendor, but it operates like Ding Tai Fung with many people making and baking the buns.

The hardest part about making any buns or any Chinese style breads is the dough. Similar to baking bread, the amount of liquid, yeast, sugar, temperature, and kneading can all affect how successful the final product would be. Thank goodness for Trader Joe’s pizza dough. It takes the guesswork (and hard work) out of the dough making. Unfortunately, there is the second most challenging part about Chinese buns is shaping the bun. Fortunately for the pepper bun, it’s just a round ball with fillings inside which is much easier to shape than the steam fried bun, but it’s still not a walk in the park though, so be forewarned!pepper bun - ingredients


image of Chinese Black Pepper Bun (胡椒餅) | pandathebaker

Chinese Black Pepper Bun (胡椒餅) | pandathebaker

Sep 19, 2016 · Chinese Black Pepper Bun (胡椒餅) September 19, 2016 ~ pandathebaker One very deep memory I have of one of my trips to Taiwan was going to the Rao He Night Market (饒河夜市) with my boyfriend over in Taipei and lining up at the Fu Zhou Pepper Buns (福州世祖胡椒饼) stall along with about 10 other eager and hungry patrons.  One very deep memory I have of one of my trips to Taiwan was going to the Rao He Night Market (饒河夜市) with my boyfriend over in Taipei and lining up at the Fu Zhou Pepper Buns (福州世祖胡椒饼) stall along with about 10 other eager and hungry patrons. The heavenly aroma of meat and….
From: pandathebaker.wordpress.com

20160625_112112One very deep memory I have of one of my trips to Taiwan was going to the Rao He Night Market (饒河夜市) with my boyfriend over in Taipei and lining up at the Fu Zhou Pepper Buns (福州世祖胡椒饼) stall along with about 10 other eager and hungry patrons. The heavenly aroma of meat and baked bread wafted to our noses as we stared in awe as workers worked at an efficient assembly line. Fill, bake, serve. No stopping to chat with customers or to take a chug of water on that hot, summer night.

20160625_112143They stuff the balls of dough with pork and scallions and then top with a heaping of white sesame seeds and put them in a huge clay pot oven to bake at a high, scorching temperature. It’s truly a mesmerizing process as we watched them work, almost mechanically, to expertly stuff and seal the buns. We were rewarded after a 10 minute wait and about $1.50 paid to the cashier a steaming hot, freshly baked black pepper pork bun.

I greedily bit into it and was rewarded with a crunchy exterior and a gush of oozing pork juices that were scalding hot. Despite my minor burns, it was completely worth it. The pork was perfectly salted and spiced and the fresh aroma of Taiwanese scallions cannot be beat. I fell in love at first bite, truly. If they weren’t massive and the size of my entire palm, I would’ve scarfed it down completely, but thankfully my boyfriend helped me polish off the remainders.

20160625_113743Now that I’m in the U.S., this luscious black pepper bun is only a distant memory. A few weekends ago, on a sudden whim, I decided I wanted to try my hand at making my own. With the help of my mom, we concocted our own version of this famous Pork Bun, which turned out quite successful. The dough uses an oil and flour dough for a flakier and crisp exterior, so be aware that it is made separately. Other than that, it’s a very straight-forward process. We used lean ground pork but you could easily opt for a different hunk of meat in your buns. Heck, ground beef works just as well, but it will have a bit of a gamier taste to it compared to pork.

20160625_121110Remember to fill the buns with scallions after the meat, and not mixed into the meat, or you’ll lose that fragrance from the extra stuffed scallions. Seal it very well or you’ll risk losing that delicious pork juice that makes these buns so great! Keep a watchful eye on the oven and if you find that they’re cooked but the outsides aren’t brown enough to your liking, turn the temperature up to 425 F for 2-3 minutes for that great crust. Now go forth and enjoy these classic and very much coveted Black Pepper Pork Buns!

Note*** This version of the recipe is solely mine. When re-posting, please cite me and my website.

Copyright september 2016 ©

Happy eats!


image of Hujiao Bing: How to Make Taiwanese Beef Pepper Buns ...

Hujiao Bing: How to Make Taiwanese Beef Pepper Buns ...

Hujiao Bing, or the Taiwanese Pepper Bun, is a kind of baked bun originating in Fuzhou City, the capital of the Fujian province of China. It is a street food that has become popular in Taiwan and can be found throughout Taiwan in night markets or mini food stalls..
From: www.desidakaar.com

Hujiao Bing, or the Taiwanese Pepper Bun, is a kind of baked bun originating in Fuzhou City, the capital of the Fujian province of China. It is a street food that has become popular in Taiwan and can be found throughout Taiwan in night markets or mini food stalls.

The common ingredients are flour, milk, an internal dough shell leavening agent, as well as meat protein, usually pork or beef, marinated with sugar, soy sauce, white pepper or black pepper, and inside filling scallions.

The outer shell of the dough is made with flour, water, and a leavening agent such as yeast or baking powder. Often, lard, butter, or oil is added to the dough to make the bun extra crunchy and flaky when baked like a croissant. The outer shell dough is then rolled individually, similar to a dumpling wrapping, into a thin, circular shape.

TAIWANESE BEEF PEPPER BUN
  • Author: Romae Chanice Marquez
  • Recipe Category: Snacks / Appetizer
  • Cuisine: Chinese Origin, Taiwanese Style

In this recipe, the main ingredients of filling are beef. The beef is thinly sliced or ground. Many vendors use ground or sliced meat to give a bite to the bun, but typically, ground meat is used because when cooked, it creates more juice. The whole preparation and cooking time is about 40 minutes. This recipe is suitable for four people. 

Taiwanese Beef Pepper Bun
Taiwanese Beef Pepper Bun Ingredients
  • 1 pound of ground beef
  • 3 tablespoons of soy sauce
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons of sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon of rice wine
  • 1 teaspoon of freshly grated ginger
  • 2 medium garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon of honey
  • 2 teaspoons of ground white pepper
  • 1 teaspoon of ground black pepper
  • 3 cups of thinly sliced green onions (about 2 bunches)
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 tablespoon of water
  • 1/2 cup of sesame seeds
  • 2 teaspoons of active dry yeast
  • 1 cup of warm water
  • 3 cups of all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons of cooking oil
Taiwanese Beef Pepper Bun Instructions

Step 1: In a large bowl, add the beef, soy sauce, sesame oil, sherry, ginger, sugar, white pepper, and black pepper and mix well until well mixed. Cover and relax.

Step 2: In a large mixing bowl, blend the yeast with warm water. In a stand mixer with a dough hook, mix in the flour and oil and knead until the dough is smooth and elastic (5 to 10 minutes).

Step 3: Form the dough into a ball and scrape the dough ball with a little water. Cover the dough ball loosely with a towel and let it rise for about 30 minutes in a warm place.

Step 4: Heat the oven up to 400° F. Take the filling of beef from the fridge and set aside.

Step 5: Punch the dough down and break into 10 small balls of equal size and put them on your lightly floured table. Flatten the dough balls to about 5 inches wide in circles.

Step 6: Extend over the filling the sides of the dough circles to enclose, then pinch to seal. Make sure your dough is well sealed; you don’t want to escape any filling. Form into a bun shape and put side-down seam on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper or lightly dusted with flour.

Step 7: Whisk together the egg and water in a small bowl when all your buns are shaped. Place the sesame seeds on a large plate. Use the egg mixture to clean the tops of the muffins and dip the buns in the sesame seeds to cover the tops only.

Step 8: Bake the buns for 25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until the top is golden brown, and cook through the beef.

Taiwanese Beef Pepper Bun Additional Information
  • Per servinghas 199 calories, 19g of carbohydrates, 8g of fat, and 12g of protein. 
  • This recipe started gaining popularity outside of Taiwan when it was featured on tourist programs such as Anthony Bourdain’s The Layover. 
  • This recipe serves around 4 people.
  • The cook/prep time is about 40 minutes total.
About Taiwanese Beef Pepper Bun Recipe

On the thin dough, the marinated meat is spread. In traditional recipes, a handful of sliced green scallions are then covered with the dough on top of the food.

To give the bun a strong scallion flavor, the scallions must be added in a separate phase – but never mixed in the meat filling.

The sealed end is on the bottom, unlike with other buns. The bun’s top is then sprayed with water and sprinkled with white sesame seeds.

Conclusion

The cooked pepper bun has a crunchy, thin, cracker-like crust. It will drip beef juices when bitten down on. This is one of the main reasons why it’s gaining more popularity everywhere today. For more international recipes, click here.

Featured Image: @pursuitofyumminess / Instagram, @kekocooks / Instagram


image of Hujiao bing - Wikipedia

Hujiao bing - Wikipedia

.
From: en.wikipedia.org

Chinese baked bun

Hujiao bing or pepper bun (Chinese: 胡椒餅; pinyin: hujiao bing; Pe̍h-oe-ji: ho͘-chio-piaⁿ; lit. 'black pepper cake or biscuit') is a type of baked bun that originated in city of Fuzhou, the capital of China's Fujian province. It is a street food that has become quite popular in Taiwan and can be found in night markets or mini food stalls throughout Taiwan. The common ingredients are flour, water, and a leavening agent for the outer dough shell, and a meat protein (usually pork or beef) marinated with sugar, soy sauce, white pepper or black pepper, and scallion for the inside filling.[1]

Origin[edit]

It is not known who invented the hujiaobing. The dish can be found in Fujian and in Taiwan. Taiwanese vendors list the item as "Fuzhou Pepper Bun" (福州胡椒餅) and credit the creation of the bun to Fuzhounese immigrants. Many of the oldest pepper bun vendors were established by those of Fuzhounese ancestry.

Preparation[edit]

The outer dough shell is prepared with flour, water, and a leavening agent such as yeast or baking powder. Lard, butter or oil is sometime added to the dough to make the bun extra crunchy and flaky like a croissant when cooked. The outer shell dough is then individually rolled to a thin circular shape, similar to a dumpling wrapping.

The main ingredients of the filling are meat which is usually pork. The meat is either ground or sliced thinly. Some vendors use ground and sliced meat to give the bun a bite to it, but ground meat is usually used since it produces more juice when cooked. The meat is usually marinated with a heaping of white or black pepper powder, soy sauce, sugar and cooking wine. Some vendors also add five-spice powder or curry powder to the meat marinade.

The marinated meat is spread on the thin dough. A handful of cut green scallions is then placed on top of the meat and sealed up with the dough. The scallions must be added in a separate step - never mixed into the meat filling - to produce a clear scallion taste to the bun. Unlike other buns, the sealed end is on the bottom. The top of the bun is then brushed with water and finished with a sprinkling of white sesame seeds.

The buns are then baked in a cylindrical, high-heat, clay oven that is similar to a tandoori oven. Burning charcoal is put at the bottom to heat the oven. The buns are then stacked vertically along the side of the oven, from bottom to top. To remove the finished buns, a flat object such as a blunt knife or spatula is used to scrape the bun off of the side of the oven. A colander is then used to catch the buns to prevent them from falling into the charcoal pit at the bottom of the oven.[2]

The cooked bun has a crunchy, thin dough, almost cracker like. When bitten into, meat juices pour out. Due to the way that the bun is wrapped, the green scallions are at the center of the bun with the meat wrapped around them, instead of at the bottom.

Popularity[edit]

The Hujiao bing first started gaining popularity outside of Taiwan when it was featured on tourist programs such as Anthony Bourdain's The Layover.[3] Also Hong Kong's TVB channel foodie show Neighborhood Gourmet season 3. The item soon became a tourist must try when visiting Taiwan. Tourist who visited Taiwan and had tasted the bun would blog about it. The wait to buy a Hujiao bing is notoriously long during peak hours at any vendors, the average wait is usually 30 minutes minimum. Customers also always buy in batches due to the long wait in line. When the vendor sell out and runs out of ingredients they usually close shop for the day instead restocking their ingredients to make more buns.

References[edit]


image of Hujiao Bing Recipe (Fuzhou Black Pepper Bun) | EpersianFood

Hujiao Bing Recipe (Fuzhou Black Pepper Bun) | EpersianFood

Feb 17, 2020 · Hujiao bing or pepper bun (literally meaning ‘black pepper cake or biscuit’) is a type of baked bun from Fuzhou, the capital of China’s Fujian province. Hujiao bing is also a popular street food in Taiwan and you can find it in night markets or …Hujiao bing or pepper bun (literally meaning 'black pepper cake or biscuit') is a type of baked bun from Fuzhou, the capital of China's Fujian province..
From: www.epersianfood.com

Hujiao Bing Recipe (Fuzhou Black Pepper Bun)

Posted in : Fast Food

on February 17, 2020

Hujiao bing or pepper bun (literally meaning ‘black pepper cake or biscuit’) is a type of baked bun from Fuzhou, the capital of China’s Fujian province. Hujiao bing is also a popular street food in Taiwan and you can find it in night markets or mini food stalls throughout this country. The common ingredients for Hujiao bing include flour, water, leavening agent for the outer dough shell, meat (usually pork or beef) marinated with sugar, soy sauce, white or black pepper, and scallion for the filling.

It is not known who invented this dish. Taiwanese vendors list it as “Fuzhou Pepper Bun” and credit Fuzhounese immigrants for creating this bun. Many of the oldest pepper bun vendors were established by those of Fuzhounese ancestry.

This food first started gaining popularity outside of Taiwan when it was featured on tourist programs such as Anthony Bourdain’s The Layover, and Hong Kong’s TVB channel food show Neighborhood Gourmet. Hujiao bing soon became a tourist must try dish when visiting Taiwan. People who visited Taiwan and had tasted the bun would blog about it. The wait to buy it is really long during peak hours at any vendors, 30 minutes minimum. That is why customers always buy black pepper buns in batches.

It is interesting to know that when the vendor sell out and runs out of ingredients, they usually close shop for the day instead restocking their ingredients to make more buns.

Black Pepper Buns Recipe

These cooked bun has a crunchy, thin dough, almost cracker like. When you bite into it, meat juices pour out. Due to the way that you will wrap the buns, the green scallions are at the center of the bun with the meat wrapped around them, instead of at the bottom.

Ingredients (for 5 servings): Preparation Steps:


image of Kavey Eats » Taiwanese Peppery Pork Buns

Kavey Eats » Taiwanese Peppery Pork Buns

Nov 06, 2020 · Instructions. For the flour paste, place 3 tablespoons of flour in a small saucepan. Add 80ml of warm water and 40ml of the warm milk. Cook over a medium heat for 3–4 minutes …This recipe for Peppery pork and spring onion filling inside fluffy baked bao (buns) from Pippa Middlehurst’s Dumplings and Noodles cookbook is inspired by her visit to the Raohe market in Ta….
From: www.kaveyeats.com

This recipe for Peppery pork and spring onion filling inside fluffy baked bao (buns) from Pippa Middlehurst’s Dumplings and Noodles cookbook is inspired by her visit to the Raohe market in Taipei, Taiwan’s capital city. The recipe makes eight generously sized buns.

Find out more about Pippa Middlehurst’s Dumplings and Noodles in our in-depth review.

We couldn’t find sufficiently fatty pork (Pippa calls for pork with more than 20% fat), so the filling was not quite as juicy as it probably should have been but we really enjoyed the buns, and will definitely make them again, seeking out suitably fatty mince via a butcher.

If you decide to buy this book after reading our content, please consider clicking through our affiliate link, located within the post and in the footnote at the end.

Kavey Eats received a review copy of Dumplings and Noodles by Pippa Middlehurst from publishers Quadrille. Recipe extracted with permission. Book cover and original recipe images provided by Quadrille, photography by India Hobson & Magnus Edmondsen. Additional images Kavey Eats. 


Raohe Night Market Black Pepper Bun 胡椒餅 – EIT

The black pepper bun is made all over Taiwan. The Chinese is “Hu Jiao Bing”. The black pepper bun is a pork/black pepper mixture. Vendors will add other spices, including spring onions. The difference is the meat filling. At Raohe, the pork filling has a good black pepper taste, the meat is tender, and the outside bread shell is crispy yet chewy..
From: www.englishintaiwan.com

The Raohe Night Market Black Pepper Bun 胡椒餅 is super popular and delicious.

A Great Snack

YUM! YUM! At Raohe Night Market? The one food to try is the black pepper bun. “Hu Jiao Bing” in Chinese. 胡椒餅

Lining Up

At the entrance near the temple, you will see the stand after you walk under the night market sign. You can’t miss the line. It can take 20-30 minutes to wait, but it’s worth it!

Below is the sign for the entrance to the Raohe Night Market near the temple. The black pepper stall is in the center row and is the first one under the sign.

The black pepper bun is made all over Taiwan. The Chinese is “Hu Jiao Bing”.

The black pepper bun is a pork/black pepper mixture. Vendors will add other spices, including spring onions. The difference is the meat filling. At Raohe, the pork filling has a good black pepper taste, the meat is tender, and the outside bread shell is crispy yet chewy.

Watch the Prep Process

While you are standing in line, you can see the whole process of how the food is made. There are up to 8 workers prepping the dough, stuffing the dough with filling, and then “baking” the bun in 5 large hot canisters. The buns stick to the side of the canisters and bake. Up to 50 can fit in one canister.

Below, workers stuff the meat and onions into the fresh dough.

The workers are like a machine. They keep churning out the buns to get ready for cooking.

Once the buns are stuffed, they are sprinkled with sesame seeds.

“Bakers” stick the buns to the sides of the hot canisters. They bake for 10 minutes and then are pulled out by hand.

Hot and Fresh!!

Below, a lone black pepper bun that has been freshly baked and pulled from the canister.  Each bun costs 50NT.

In Taiwan, long lines mean good food. The line for the buns are long. At times you can wait up to 30 minutes. The line moves orderly and they are well worth the wait.

Below is the finished product. Be careful with that first bite as they are hot and juicy. Carerful, they are addicting.

Related Pages:

Ning Xia Night Market | Ning Xia Night Market-What to Eat | Raohe Night Market | Raohe Night Market’s Black Pepper Bun | Shilin Night Market


image of Recipe of Award-winning Hujiao bing (Taiwanese pepper buns ...

Recipe of Award-winning Hujiao bing (Taiwanese pepper buns ...

Sep 21, 2020 · Hujiao Bing is a simple bun filled with a variety of fillings. With the aim of providing the basic recipe for this luscious pepper bun, we will be celebrating its inspiring The traditional Hujiao Bing originated from the Fuzhou region of mainland China, and it later became the staple of Taiwanese cuisine.Hujiao bing (Taiwanese pepper buns) Hey everyone, it is Jim, welcome to my recipe page. Today, we’re going to make a special dish, hujiao bing (taiwanese pepper buns). It is one of my favorites food recipes. For mine, I’m gonna make it a little bit tasty. This will be really delicious. Hújiāo bǐng or Pepper bun is a type of baked bun that originated in city of Fuzhou, the capital of China’s Fujian province..
From: cherry-secret-recipe.com

Hujiao bing (Taiwanese pepper buns)
Hujiao bing (Taiwanese pepper buns)

Hey everyone, it is Jim, welcome to my recipe page. Today, we’re going to make a special dish, hujiao bing (taiwanese pepper buns). It is one of my favorites food recipes. For mine, I’m gonna make it a little bit tasty. This will be really delicious.

Hujiao bing or Pepper bun is a type of baked bun that originated in city of Fuzhou, the capital of China's Fujian province. It is a street food that has become quite popular in Taiwan and can be found in night markets or mini food stalls throughout Taiwan. The pepper pork bun, sometimes known as Hu Jiao Bing (Ju Jiao Bing), is a bun with a filling of pork and black pepper mixture.

Hujiao bing (Taiwanese pepper buns) is one of the most popular of recent trending meals in the world. It’s easy, it’s quick, it tastes delicious. It is appreciated by millions daily. They’re nice and they look wonderful. Hujiao bing (Taiwanese pepper buns) is something which I have loved my entire life.

To get started with this recipe, we have to prepare a few ingredients. You can cook hujiao bing (taiwanese pepper buns) using 20 ingredients and 6 steps. Here is how you can achieve that.

The ingredients needed to make Hujiao bing (Taiwanese pepper buns):

Taiwan is definitely one of my favorite countries to visit. The traditional hu jiao bing has green onion not mix into the meat filling, instead it is stuffed separately from the meat filling. Pepper bun has become one of the most loved street food in Taiwan. Hujiao Bing (胡椒餅 Fujaobin) is a dish made by Soma Yukihira and Joichiro Yukihira.

Instructions to make Hujiao bing (Taiwanese pepper buns):

A dish made by Soma during the Moon Banquet Festival. However, he first learned about this dish when his father acquired a clay oven from one of his acquaintances. Hujiao Bing is a simple bun filled with a variety of fillings. With the aim of providing the basic recipe for this luscious pepper bun, we will be celebrating its inspiring The traditional Hujiao Bing originated from the Fuzhou region of mainland China, and it later became the staple of Taiwanese cuisine. Hujiao Bing actually originated from the Fuzhou Region of China, but what has made it into a Essentially, it is peppered and seasoned beef or pork inside of a steamed bun with chopped Have you ever tried anything like this before or anything like Taiwanese stall food?

So that’s going to wrap this up for this exceptional food hujiao bing (taiwanese pepper buns) recipe. Thank you very much for reading. I’m confident that you can make this at home. There is gonna be more interesting food in home recipes coming up. Remember to bookmark this page in your browser, and share it to your family, friends and colleague. Thanks again for reading. Go on get cooking!


image of Chinese pepper buns (胡椒餅) - Eva Bakes

Chinese pepper buns (胡椒餅) - Eva Bakes

Apr 05, 2020 · Chinese pepper buns (胡椒餅) are a popular street food in Taiwan. They are typically made in a round cylinder-shaped oven, but you can make this at home in your regular …Chinese pepper buns (胡椒餅) are a popular street food in Taiwan. They are typically made in a round cylinder-shaped oven, but you can make this….
From: www.eva-bakes.com

Chinese pepper buns (胡椒餅) are a popular street food in Taiwan. They are typically made in a round cylinder-shaped oven, but you can make this at home in your regular oven.

I am sad. We were supposed to be in Taiwan right now for spring break. Obviously, because of COVID-19, we have had to isolate ourselves and practice social distancing. We cancelled our flights, hotels and AirBNBs and also our food tour. Hopefully, if things go well, we can reschedule for later this year.

Many months ago, we started watching YouTube videos on Taipei and Tokyo to see what foods we needed to try during our trip. One of the things that kept appearing in these videos were these Chinese pepper buns (胡椒餅). Our mouths immediately began salivating as soon as we saw the street cart owners assembling them. Since we weren’t able to sample these over spring break, I tried making them on my own.

I happened to have some homemade pizza crust in my freezer. I thawed it out in the morning so it was ready to use by the afternoon. While we all liked the buns, we agreed that the crust wasn’t as thin or crispy as we wanted. The next time we make these, we will likely use the recipe from these shen jian bao. The three of us enjoyed these buns with some Chinese sweet chili sauce and Korean hot sauce. We turned these into a meal, and there was still plenty left over.

Hopefully we will be able to visit Tokyo and Taipei soon. I really want to try these in Taiwan!


image of Yokohama Chinatown Street Food Guide | byFood

Yokohama Chinatown Street Food Guide | byFood

Sesame balls, soup dumplings, Peking duck, egg tarts, and more! The Yokohama Chinatown Street Food Guide covers the best street food in Asia’s largest Chinatown..
From: www.byfood.com

Yokohama, the capital city of Kanagawa, is the second largest city in Japan and home to the largest Chinatown in Asia. At Yokohama Chinatown, you can get your fix of everything from Hong Kong-style egg tarts to Peking duck to Taiwanese noodle soups.

While you can certainly have an incredible meal at a sit-down Chinese restaurant in Yokohama and there is no shortage of restaurants offering tabehoudai, or all-you-can-eat deals, going on a street food adventure is definitely the best way to explore the authentic Chinese foods that Yokohama Chinatown has to offer. This Yokohama Chinatown Street Food Guide will introduce you to some of the most delicious savory and sweet street foods, as well let you know which ones you can pass on with no regrets.

9 Yokohama Chinatown Street Foods to Try

Here are 9 sweet and savory dishes to try at Yokohama Chinatown!

1. Yaki Shoronpo (Fried Soup Dumplings)

Yaki shoronpo, or pan-fried soup dumplings, are a staple of the Yokohama Chinatown street food scene. Filled with collagen-rich pork broth, these soup dumplings are popular with women, as collagen reportedly aids in keeping skin smooth and supple, slowing down signs of aging, as well as helping build muscle and lose fat.

This shop sells three types of soup dumplings: masamune shoronpo are stuffed to the brim with juicy pork, fukahire shoronpo contain thin strands of shark fin, and hisui shoronpo are filled with pork and seven kinds of vegetables. The dough is just thick enough that the bottom generates a firm crust, but delicate enough that it’s easy to pierce through with a chopstick.

There’s an art to eating shoronpo. While some pioneers forge ahead with reckless abandon, daring to pop the innocent-looking little dumpling into their mouth whole, this route only leads to scalded tastebuds and shame.

The advanced method of eating yaki shoronpo starts off with making a hole in the top of the dumpling to let some steam escape. Once it has cooled off, you can raise the dumpling to your mouth and sip the rich broth. After you’ve sipped all the broth, you’ll be able to take a bite without the dumpling sending droplets of soup squirting out like a fire hydrant. Alternatively, just go ahead and eat it whole. But consider yourself warned!

2. Koshou Mochi (Taiwanese Black Pepper Bun)

While Yokohama Chinatown is famous for chukaman (steamed Chinese buns such as nikuman meat buns and anman red bean buns), you can find steamed buns all over Japan in supermarkets and convenience stores. Now, koshou mochi, Taiwanese black pepper buns, are really something special...

Baked, rather than steamed, in a deep clay oven much like an Indian tandoor oven, they have a lovely crunchy outer texture and a very soft interior jam-packed with tender and peppery meat. They’re a street food staple of Taiwanese night markets, and are a hearty and filling option, with just enough peppery heat to warm you up on a chilly winter day in Tokyo.

3. Peking Duck

Hailing from Beijing, Peking duck is a delicacy among Yokohama Chinatown street food, with the price tag to match. Tuck into a whole Peking duck for a whopping 7800 yen, roughly 70 U.S. dollars, or half of one for 4000 yen.

Or, you could go for a rolled pancake wrap featuring a couple of freshly-sliced strips of Peking duck, drizzled with a sweet and savory sauce, and nestled up beside pan-fried veggies and a fresh leaf of lettuce. But honestly, for the price of 250 yen, two thin slivers of Peking duck are hardly worth it, especially as the flavor and texture of the Peking duck, a dish renowned for its crispy skin, are overwhelmed and dampened by the sauce (though to be clear, the sauce is pretty delicious).

So, when you’re beckoned by that ever-present line outside the Peking duck wrap shops, which seem to promise tasty things within, keep walking. This is one Yokohama Chinatown street food to pass on.

4. Mensen (Taiwanese Oyster Noodle Soup)

Another classic Taiwanese street food available in Yokohama Chinatown, mensen is a Taiwanese oyster noodle soup made with oysters and misua (vermicelli noodles), and sometimes pork intestine.

Super warming and comforting, Taiwanese mensen is perfect for a chilly day or evening. The thin, slippery noodles are addictingly slurpable, and the broth is thick and smooth with a slight seafood-y brininess. The cilantro garnish adds a bit of brightness (but if your palate puckers at the mention of the divisive herb, you can ask them to omit it when you order).

Still have room for dessert? If not, go ahead and work up an appetite by taking a walk around the block and checking out some Chinese souvenirs, because you won’t want to miss out on Yokohama Chinatown’s desserts!

5. Egg Tart

If you come to Yokohama Chinatown, a Hong Kong style egg tart is a must-try! The egg filling is smooth and custardy, and very subtly sweet. Even if you don’t have a sweet tooth, you can definitely enjoy this as a dessert after you’ve eaten your fill of street food.

The exterior is crispy and flaky, the dough perfectly laminated with those lovely layers that shatter when you take a bite. Somehow the puff pastry doesn’t feel oily or greasy, but very light and airy. It’s the perfect bite.

6. Age Goma Dango (Fried Sesame Ball)

Of course, the fan favorite age goma dango, or fried sesame ball, had to make this list of Yokohama Chinatown street foods! With the crispy sesame-studded exterior and smooth red bean paste filling, sesame balls are pure joy in a bite. We’re talking ridiculously delicious, especially if you can get them while they’re still hot out of the fryer.

7. Kuro Goma An Iri Shiratama (Sesame-Filled Rice Dumplings in Ginger Syrup)

Known as tangyuan in Mandarin Chinese, the Japanese name is more of a mouthful, kuro goma an irishiratama, meaning black sesame-filled dumplings. 

Swimming in an insanely yummy sweet ginger syrup, these ground sesame-filled mochi-like dango are yet another major hit! The kick from the ginger pairs beautifully with the sweet dango, which are chewy and stretchy and oh-so-soft. The warm, gingery, syrupy broth would be very gentle on a sore throat, and would be a nice pick-me-up if you’re feeling a little under the weather. While the syrup is quite sugary, it pairs well with the goma dango, which have a very toned-down sweetness and toasty roasted flavor.

8. Panda-man (Panda-shaped Steamed Bun)

This neighborhood is crawling with pandas, the official Yokohama Chinatown mascot. You can even get a cute steamed panda bun! But while these adorable buns qualify as Instagram-worthy, the chocolate-flavored panda-man was a bit of a miss, as the flavor of the chocolate filling was on the blander side.

But try other types of these cute animal-shaped steamed buns; there may be a hit among them! They come in a variety of flavors and colors, with both sweet and savory options. The pig-shaped steamed bun, for example, has a pork filling, while the green panda bun is matcha flavored.

9. Annindofu (Apricot Kernel Milk Pudding)

Annindofu is quite similar to the Chinese dessert, douhua, which is a very silky tofu pudding. But while the name “annindofu” sounds like it implies “tofu,” this dessert is actually made with agar-agar (a gelatin-like thickening agent made from seaweed) and not soybeans.

Annindofu has a gentle sweetness, super smooth and slippery texture, and mild almond-like flavor. But, rather than almond milk, annindofu is made with apricot kernel milk, which has that almond-like flavor and a very pleasant fresh aftertaste. Like the Hong Kong egg tart, annindofu is very subtly sweet, and it is also light on the stomach so it’s the perfect dessert to end with after indulging in your favorite Yokohama Chinatown street foods.

How to Access Yokohama Chinatown

The closest station to Yokohama Chinatown is Motomachi Chukagai Station on Minatomirai Line, just a 6-minute walk away (take the Chukagai Exit). Alternatively, take an 8-minute walk from Ishikawacho Station on the Negishi Line (leave through the Chukagai Exit, North Exit).

Read Kobe Chinatown Street Food Guide for more street food gems or join our Facebook group for more Japanese food news and trends.


image of Black and Red Bell Pepper Steamed Pork Buns — LITTLE FAT BOY

Black and Red Bell Pepper Steamed Pork Buns — LITTLE FAT BOY

A colorful riff on the flavors of Taiwanese pork pepper buns, this steamed bun is filled with pork that's seasoned with black pepper and red bell pepper paste and paired with napa cabbage and shittake mushrooms..
From: www.littlefatboy.com


image of Taiwanese black pepper buns, a night market staple ...

Taiwanese black pepper buns, a night market staple ...

In a small bowl, mix together the soy sauce, rice wine, oyster sauce, sesame oil, white and black peppers, sugar, five-spice powder and half a tea­spoon of salt. Add this to the pork, mix ...Have you ever been on a trip and eaten something so memorable you wanted to know how to make it back home? Susan Jung did, and reverse-engineered a Taiwanese night market treat..
Keyword: Asian, Taiwanese, snack, pork, flour, pepper, lard, spring onions
From: www.scmp.com


FOOD WARS REAL | Taiwanese Black Pepper Buns 食戟のソーマ ...

Chinese New Year Food 2021: CRISPY, FLUFFY, JUICY AND MOIST Black Pepper Buns, a CLASSIC Taiwanese street food snack. We're back at it today with another Foo....
From: www.youtube.com


image of Hujiao Bing Recipe- Black Pepper Buns - Yum Of China

Hujiao Bing Recipe- Black Pepper Buns - Yum Of China

One of the most popular snacks in Taiwan, a fresh bread and bacon-lovers dream come true: these Stuffed Black Pepper Buns are guaranteed to please!.
From: www.yumofchina.com


image of Taiwanese Pepper Bun with Beef (Hu Jiao Bing) | 牛肉胡椒餅 ...

Taiwanese Pepper Bun with Beef (Hu Jiao Bing) | 牛肉胡椒餅 ...

Taiwanese Pepper Bun with Beef (Hu Jiao Bing) | 牛肉胡椒餅 Pepper bun has become one of the most loved street food in Taiwan. Imagine a calzone filled with perfectly spiced juicy meat, but cooked in a charcoal-fired Tandoori oven until it’s crispy on …Pepper bun has become one of the most loved street food in Taiwan. Imagine a calzone filled with perfectly spiced juicy meat, but cooked in a charcoal-fired Tandoori oven until it’s crispy on the outside but dripping with juice inside. Now you can make this spicy, flavorful and ridiculously juicy pepper bun in your own kitchen. I seriously can’t […].
From: www.choochoocachew.com


image of Hujiao bing (Taiwanese Pork Pepper Buns) | YepRecipes.com

Hujiao bing (Taiwanese Pork Pepper Buns) | YepRecipes.com

Jul 31, 2018 · Hujiao bing (Taiwanese Pork Pepper Buns) A popular street food in Taiwan, sesame seed buns filled with layers of peppered pork and green onions. YEP RATING: 100% …A popular street food in Taiwan, sesame seed buns filled with layers of peppered pork and green onions..
Keyword: hujiao, bing, taiwanese, pork, pepper, buns, dairyfree, asian, main_dishes, ground, food, recipe, Main Dishes
From: www.yeprecipes.com


Taiwanese Pepper Bun Recipe (胡椒餅) - ItsMyDish - …

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From: www.youtube.com


Taiwanese Street Food - Pepper Bun (Hujiao Bing) | 🇬🇧 🇹🇼 ...

Pepper bun (pinyin: Hujiao bing) is a common street food in Taiwan. When I was in Taiwan and passed a pepper bun stall, the smell of pepper bun always let me....
From: www.youtube.com


Pepper Pork Bun, Hu Jiao Bing - Taiwan Street Food - YouTube

The pepper pork bun, sometimes known as Hu Jiao Bing (Ju Jiao Bing), is a bun with a filling of pork and black pepper mixture. Huge amount of spring onions i....
From: www.youtube.com


image of Black Pepper Pork Bao | bun-dles

Black Pepper Pork Bao | bun-dles

Taiwanese-style juicy, black pepper free range pork cooked with spring onions, shallots and Chinese cabbage in soft, fluffy buns Serves 2 | 6 bao INGREDIENTSBao dough: wheat flour, water, sugar, rapeseed oil, yeast, baking powder, saltFilling: British free range pork (30.9%), Chinese leaf (12.4%), shallot (6.2%), spring onion (3.1%), ginger, citric acid, soy sauce …Taiwanese-style juicy, black pepper free range pork cooked with spring onions, shallots and Chinese cabbage in soft, fluffy buns Serves 2 | 6 bao INGREDIENTSBao dough: wheat flour, water, sugar, rapeseed oil, yeast, baking powder, saltFilling: British free range pork (30.9%), Chinese leaf (12.4%), shallot (6.2%), spring onion (3.1%), ginger, citric acid, soy sauce (soybeans, wheat), Shaoxing wine (contains wheat, colour: plain caramel), black pepper (0.4%), sesame oilSprinkled with black sesame seeds ALLERGENSFor all allergens, please see ingredients in bold. We do not operate in an allergen free kitchen so please be aware that traces of nuts and other allergens may be present..
From: bun-dles.com


胡椒餅 / Fujiaobing(Taiwanese Pepper Buns) - YouTube

ニコニコ動画にアップロードしたものに英語レシピを追加したものです。BGMはこちらからお借りしています。:http://musmus ....
From: www.youtube.com


How to Make PEPPER BUNS! JUICY & CRUNCHY Taiwanese …

These Taiwanese pepper buns (hujiao bing) are so juicy, light, and crunchy! A super easy recipe that is (almost) as good as the famous pepper buns in Taiwan!....
From: www.youtube.com


Black Pepper Buns (Food Wars, Yukihira/Isshiki, M/M ...

Oct 25, 2021 · That’s right—Yukihira was preparing to make Taiwanese black pepper buns for the upcoming Moon Festival. He must be testing his recipe. Sounds like using pepper over and over again as he perfected the buns was finally getting to his nose. Isshiki smiled to himself and took a swipe at the dust on the ceiling tile underneath him before sitting ...Hello! I just finished watching Food Wars, and it's easily one of my favorite shows of all time. Isshiki is absolutely my favorite...so serene and lighthearted...and I want to break him. In a vulnerable sneezy manner, of course. 😈I don't think you need to have watched any of the show in order to ....
Keyword: Male, Pepper, Fanfic
From: www.sneezefetishforum.com


Macau Street Food Cray !!! Black Pepper Buns | That Food ...

Aug 09, 2013 · Black pepper cakes are actually a Taiwanese thang, but #veryrare and hard to find in Hong Kong. Deez cakes are essentially flaky biscuit-like buns stuffed with piping hot juicy peppery meat and chive filling roasted in an extremely hot clay oven. Priced at $5 MOP or $0.70 USD per bun, pepper buns are a steal of a deal..
From: www.thatfoodcray.com


Best Black Pepper Bun in Taipei ... - Jaysun Eats Taipei

Dec 16, 2021 · Each one told me how my favorite black pepper bun place wouldn’t be as good as theirs. Both changed their minds after a couple bites into the delicious bun. The buns are baked for about twenty minutes in a traditional brick oven. The size of the bun is a little larger than most other places. Each black pepper bun costs NT$45.Review of 福元胡椒餅, the best black pepper bun in Taipei. Includes pictures, hours, address, Google map, related video, & more..
Keyword: black, pepper, bun, Taipei, best, 福元胡椒餅
From: www.jaysuneatstaipei.com


Beginner Cook Tries to Make Famous TAIWANESE PEPPER BUN ...

The pepper bun (aka Hujiao bing) is one of my favorite street foods EVER, and I foun... In today's video, we are trying to make the famous Taiwanese PEPPER BUN!.
From: www.youtube.com


福州世祖胡椒餅 - 91 Photos & 31 Reviews - Street Vendors - 饒河 …

Fuzhou Black Pepper Bun 福州世祖胡椒餅 is one of the 5 food stands that is on Michelin's Bib Gourmand 2018 list. There was a line when I got there and it was moving fast. This is not the first or the best Fuzhou Black Pepper Bun I had before as they have a few locations. For NT$50 it is a perfect snack especially on a chilly evening..
From: www.yelp.com


image of Taiwanese Pepper Bun (胡椒餅) - It's My Dish | Recipe ...

Taiwanese Pepper Bun (胡椒餅) - It's My Dish | Recipe ...

Mar 1, 2016 - Trader Joe’s pizza dough is so versatile you can make a Taiwanese Pepper Bun with ease. This recipe brings the delicious street food to your kitchen.Mar 1, 2016 - Trader Joe’s pizza dough is so versatile you can make a Taiwanese Pepper Bun with ease. This recipe brings the delicious street food to your kitchen..
From: www.pinterest.com


image of Easiest Way to Make Any-night-of-the-week Hujiao bing ...

Easiest Way to Make Any-night-of-the-week Hujiao bing ...

Hujiao bing (Taiwanese pepper buns). Hújiāo bǐng or pepper bun is a type of baked bun that originated in city of Fuzhou, the capital of China's Fujian province. It is a street food that has become quite popular in Taiwan and can be found in night markets or mini food stalls throughout Taiwan. A popular street food in Taiwan, sesame seed buns ...Hujiao bing (Taiwanese pepper buns) . Hújiāo bǐng or pepper bun is a type of baked bun that originated in city of Fuzhou, the capital ....
Keyword: Easiest Way to Make Any-night-of-the-week Hujiao bing (Taiwanese pepper buns)
From: marpacsoundsave.blogspot.com